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February 14, 2024

State of Play in February 2024 for Exchanges

A February update on the special issue fun and games, and everything that's going on with the journal right now.

My apologies to regular readers for neglecting the blog somewhat in recent weeks. I have had quite a busy few weeks dealing primarily with the submission deadlines for two special issues [1] coming at the end of January which has been followed by a huge wave of submission to Exchanges. I’ve also taught a couple of classes and had a filthy cold too. However, in terms of the manuscripts we have had far more submissions in a relatively short period than I’ve ever dealt with before. Certainly in all my years on the journal at least! Even our biggest issues to date – the Nerds and Cannibalism special issues, had submissions spread across a much broader period of time as I recall. In the past two weeks though with the two issues I’ve had at least 50 new articles to deal with – which for Exchanges equates to about the number we can have submitted in an entire year.

So, yes, it has been a busy old time. But I’ll say it’s been a really exciting one too. To have so many potentially fantastic papers by so many wonderful authors around the world, entrusted with the journal for consideration is deeply gratifying. It’s at times like these I wonder if Exchanges might be better off being a special issues journal all of the time, as each of these special issues have had such a high volume of contributions. Although perhaps not quite this high!

Of course, part and parcel of this workload for me has been training and supporting the small new army of associate editors we now have working on the two issues. I have to say they are all acquitting themselves superbly, and while there are a lot of questions – that is to be expected! And indeed, encouraged! I don’t expect associate editors to be able to run before they can walk, so such guidance is freely and gratefully given. It is also refreshing to have many new people working on the journal. Not only for the fresh energy and enthusiasm they bring, which they certainly do, but also for the new insights they offer. Things I might not otherwise have thought about. Elements I’ve not considered for a while. Or new perspectives from angles I might not even have otherwise taken. Consequently, they’ve gotten me thinking about a few tasks on the back end of the journal that would benefit from my attention. Tasks that otherwise might have sat on the back burner indefinitely.

We’re also in a week of Library Board and Team meetings, a chance for me to update all of the team about what’s going on broadly with Exchanges. But also for them all to reflect back on the experience and share their opinions on topics of mutual interest. There’s probably a separate post I’ll write about that next week.

In the meantime, it’s back to dealing with yet another new submission this morning. One thing I can say about February 2024 for Exchanges – it isn’t a quiet month – and all the better for it!

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Endnotes

[1] The MRC @ 50 and Research Culture issues respectively. Read about them both earlier in the blog!


December 20, 2023

Exploring the Queerness as Strength Call for Papers

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/podcast

One last podcast for 2023 looks at our exciting new special issue call

There’s always room for one more – podcast episode that is! Bringing 2023 to a close I am pleased to say we have a fabulous conversation to share with you between the highly energised Jacob Thomas (Monash University, Australia) and myself. Jacob’s our newest Editorial Board member, but they are also the special issue lead for our Queerness as Strength future issue which we announced a week or so ago. At the time I promised you a behind the scenes look at the issue – and here it is! Listen in to our conversations here:

So, in this episode we talk about Jacob’s life, work and passions and how these have informed their proposed special issue call. As such we explore the ideas and hopes behind the call, along with considering some of the areas of discussion and insight we hope to see coming from contributors. Naturally, Jacob and myself both of us expected to be surprised, challenged and delighted by the variety of topics authors will be choosing to tackle.

We talk too about our concerns in making sure how members of the ‘global majority’ and other marginalised voices can find a place in our pages – ideally aiding in rebalancing some of the prevailing global north narratives or experiences. Our conversation also touches on how the issue resonates with Exchanges mission to bring forth and celebrate emerging debate, discussion and insights, in a thrilling way.

Naturally, the episode includes some guidance on how to get involved with the call and submit your expressions of interest by the deadline. You could of course just read the call for expressions of interest via the link below, but I think you’ll find it comes to life far more when you read in and listen to the podcast too!

To skip to the most relevant part of the episode – here’s an index to our discussions.

Timecode

  • 0:00 Opening
  • 0:50 Introductions
  • 3:38 Exploring the Call
  • 4:55 Inspirations & Origins
  • 8:05 Alignment with Exchanges’ Mission
  • 11:47 Globality & Representation
  • 14:45 Why Submit to this Issue?
  • 17:58 Authentic Lives & Experiences
  • 22:17 Practicalities & Deadlines
  • 26:06 Closing & Outro

For more on publishing with Exchanges generally, see our ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠online guide for authors⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠.

And I’ll see you all back here tomorrow for an end of year wrap up post – bring games and snacks, it’s the last working day of 2023!


December 13, 2023

New Special Issue Call for Participation – Queerness as Strength

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/announcement/view/55

A new call for contributors goes live as we wrap up a busy year for Exchanges

This has probably been the busiest year on record for Exchanges, not least of which being the build up to and celebrations around our 10th anniversary issue. There’s been a lot of work behind the scenes both exploring and reconsidering our future direction and operations, alongside various events, training and lecturing contributions too. And what better way is there to cap off 2023 than with announcing our 10th special issue call for participation!

This time I am thrilled and delighted to announce we’ve partnered with scholars at Monash University, Australia to ask for contributions on the fascinating theme of Queerness as Strength. As we’ve been developing this call, it has become increasingly clear the potential wealth of fascinating research such an issue can bring to the fore. Moreover, this issue will most certainly prove to be both an interdisciplinary one alongside highlighting potentially marginalised elements of research discourse. These, as I am sure you will agree, are two aspects which speak well to Exchanges’ primary missions to enable challenging, interdisciplinary and international discourse.

You can read the details of the call here on our announcement pages:

As we’re doing this as a call for expressions of interest first, followed by invitations to submit, there are a few key dates of which potential authors might want to be aware:

  • · Deadline for expressions of interest: Friday 1st March 2024
  • · Deadline for manuscript submission: Friday 31st May 2024
  • · Anticipated Publication: Sumer 2025 [1]

Unlike some of our recent calls, like Research Culture or the MRC @ 50, this time we’re asking for papers in all our formats – from peer-reviewed articles through to the shorter editorially reviewed critical reflections and the like. This, we hope, offers potential authors the widest scope possible to contribute their thinking.

We are also hoping we will see some strong contributions not only from the global north, but from scholars based in the global majority countries too: something myself and special issue lead Jacob Thomas would strongly encourage. As always both of us are also only too happy to talk over potential submissions ahead of the deadlines if it will help authors shape their work accordingly.

We will have a special episode of the Exchanges Discourse podcast where Jacob and I talk over our hopes and ambitions for the issue coming out next week - so look out for that too!

In the meantime, we look forward to reading your submissions – happy writing!

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[1] As with all Exchanges publication dates, this will vary depending on the transit time of both peer-review and authorial revisions. However, this is our current aim, and we will update authors as the editorial work progresses.


September 27, 2023

Special Issue Call Launch (Almost) Closes Research Culture Conference

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/special-issues

Second special issue launch for September sees the focus turn to research culture.

This week saw the hosting of the International Research Culture Conference 2023 at the University of Warwick. Naturally Exchanges was in attendance, and not simply to listen to the fascinating range of talks and speakers. This conference, which was open to attendees around the UK and across the world, followed a more local event which was hosted in 2022 for Warwick staff. The success of this event plus moves at Warwick in founding its National Centre for Research Culture, demonstrated the value in throwing the doors open to the wider community – and hence the broader remit of this event.

From the journal’s perspective of course, the most important development revolved around the Centre and Conference partnering with Exchanges to produce a special issue. This will be, we hope, launched over summer 2024 with content based on and around the papers delivered at the event. Hence, towards the conclusion of the conference[1], I was able to address the delegates to formally announce the opening of the call for participation.

Call for Papers - Research Culture 2023

Now, while Exchanges relatively brief talk [2] the conference’s end was naturally a focus for your Chief Editor, I was there throughout the day on a stall. This gave me the opportunity to talk to various delegates and prospective authors about Exchanges, our work and importantly how they can contribute to the special issue. I’m delighted to report I enjoyed a considerable number of highly energised conversations with some lovely, and thoughtful, colleagues and look forward to continuing some of these over the coming weeks. Even more so I am looking forward to reading the submissions as they come in.

Now, as the special issue will capture the discussions and presentations, and as other material is available on the conference site itself, I won’t try and recreate the event from my notes. That’s certainly something you will be able to enjoy without my filter. Nevertheless, I am sure there will be many other delegates with something to say, so keep an eye out on social media for initial reflections from the event.

In the meantime, my thanks to Prof Sotaro Kita and Dr Rika Nair for their invite to collaborate on this special issue, not to mention participate in Warwick’s ongoing research cultures work.

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For more information on the special issue, and its call for papers, contact the Editor-in-Chief at exchangesjournal@warwick.ac.uk or see our announcements page. A copy of the call for papers is now available.

Endnotes

[1] I wasn't quite the final talk, as there was an address from Warwick's Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research), Prof Caroline Meyer, which formally closed the event.

[2] I was offered 10 minutes, but suggested a modest 5 with questions would be best. Certainly, at the end of a long day, when I’m between the delegates and freedom, I didn’t think it was a good idea to build my part up too much.


September 21, 2023

MRC at 50 – Conference & Special Issue Contribution Launch

Writing about web page https://warwick.ac.uk/services/library/mrc/

MRC anniversary celebrations set the scene for an exciting future journal volume.

MRC at 50Yesterday I attended the 50th anniversary symposium in honour of the Modern Records Centre (MRC) at Warwick. If you’re not been previously aware of the MRC and its work, the website and indeed the Centre itself is most certainly well worth a visit: if only to marvel at the variety and breadth of their collections. This diversity was a key element reflected across the spread of topics discussed at yesterday’s event. Speaker’s talked about their research which had all been generated – in part or in its entirety through usage of the MRC’s collections. From sex workers to trade unions through the French Resistance, disability and cycling: it was an undoubted smorgasbord of themes.

I recall, many years ago and in a previous post at Warwick, I had the opportunity to be walked through the MRC’s archive itself by the then Archivist. It was a rare opportunity to get ‘up close and personal’ with the ephemera, communications and collected papers of many significant figures in political, social and national history alike. Certainly, being that close to historical documents was a thrilling moment.

Since its founding though, the MRC has clearly had an impact far beyond Warwick itself. This was undoubtably reflected through the international scope of the discussions and presenters represented yesterday. I shan’t try and capture the essence of the day: there was so much to take in. Plus, I suspect offering this kind of perspective is an element which the special issue call we informally launched yesterday will do to a greater degree.

An archive of thinking and research to honour the archive itself!

Hence, we will be approaching all of the presenters, and a few other selected people too, over the coming weeks to invite them all to contribute a paper to this forthcoming special commemorative issue of Exchanges. I can assure readers that if its contents are anything like as engaging as yesterday’s talks, then you are in for a real treat! We hope to bring you the issue sometime in early to mid-2024, so watch out on our social media for more news as we get closer to the launch date.

My thanks to Pierre Botcherby and the whole MRC team for inviting Exchanges to form a modest but valuable marker of the MRC’s first 50 years of success!

A copy of the call for papers is now available.

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For more information on the MRC’s work or collections, visit warwick.ac.uk/services/library/mrc/ or contact archives@warwick.ac.uk. For more about the forthcoming special issue, contact Exchanges at exchangesjournal@warwick.ac.uk.


July 19, 2023

New Special Issue – Celebrating 50 Years of the Modern Records Centre

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/special-issues

Wouldn’t you know, it’s another special issue announced!

Following hot on the heels of our other special issue project announcement, I am delighted to announce that we have a second new special issue in production. This time we are partnering with the Warwick Modern Records Centre (MRC) as part of their 50th Birthday celebrations, to produce a volume incorporating reflections, insights and narratives inspired around the MRC’s work over the decades. I am especially pleased as the lead collaborator, Pierre Botcherby, is someone I worked closely with on the Then & Now Special Issue a year or so back.

The special issue is going to specifically driven by the papers and speakers who appear at the MRC’s birthday conference (The MRC at 50: Research Informed and Inspired by the Modern Records Centre) this September (20th), and will be primarily critical reflections. The idea being in this way we can more rapidly produce the issue, and share it with the world before too many months have gone by. I am also pleased to note we’ve already recruited three associate editors to work on the issue, and am looking forward to training and working alongside them on the issue.

Naturally, more news on this and the conference over the next month or so, but for now, and just before your EIC heads off on a couple of weeks of leave, it is fantastic to have these two new and exciting projects in the offing!


July 04, 2023

New Special Issue in Research Cultures Announced

Writing about web page https://warwick.ac.uk/research/supporting-talent/research-culture-at-warwick/

A new special issue project represents an exciting long-term collaboration between the journal and Research Culture programme.

We are delighted to let you know that we have partnered with Warwick’s Research Culture programme and the forthcoming Research Cultures Forum to produce a special issue. This issue, which we hope will mark the first of a series of annual collaborations, aims to comprise a range of critical reflections drawing on the sessions and speakers contributing to the conference. The conference itself is to be held Mon 25th September 2023, details of which can be found via the link above.

One reason I am especially delighted to announce this collaboration, is due to the centricity of research culture work at Warwick at the moment. Personally speaking, research cultures were the area which triggered my PhD studies a decade ago – in my case relating to open access publishing habitus of scholars in the UK.

Naturally myself and the rest of the Editorial Board are looking forward enormously to working closely with the Research Cultures team over the coming months. With any luck, the issue itself should be out in the first half of 2024, and naturally I’ll be updating readers about progress both here, in the journal editorials and our monthly newsletter too.

Meanwhile in the background, the reviewers, authors, associate editors and myself are working feverishly to bring you the long-anticipated Pluralities of Translation special issue in the latter half of 2023. More concrete news on that exciting issue, as soon as I know more.

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For more on special issues and how they come about - visit our IAS pages. Or to see the past and future special issues programme, see the journal site itself.


March 29, 2023

Special Issue: Anthropocene and More–than–Human–Worlds Published

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/issue/view/45

Issue 10.2 of the Exchanges journal is another special one.

Myself and colleagues are delighted to announce the publication of the latest special issue of the Exchanges journal. This issue contains contributions inspired by and from participants to the associated British Academy funded research project and workshop series. The workshops, centred around the theme of the 'more-than-human-world' ran online during late 2021 and saw scholars from around the world come together to talk about, and develop, their writing practice, around the project's area of interest.

Many of the participants also took the opportunity to contribute to this associated special issue, and I am grateful to each of them for their efforts in this regard.

For your ease of reading – here’s the issue’s table of contents:

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Exchanges Volume 10 Issue 2 (March 2023): https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v10i2 & https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/issue/view/45

Price, C., 2023. Saying Goodbye and Fighting for the Future. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 1-4. Available at: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v10i2.1343.

Cicholewski, A., 2023. Empathy as an Answer to Challenges of the Anthropocene in Asian American Young Adult Science Fiction. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 5-25. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.958.

Tarcan, B., Pettersen, I.N., & Edwards, F., 2023. Repositioning Craft and Design in the Anthropocene: Applying a More-Than-Human approach to textiles. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 26-49. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.973.

Price, C., 2023. Do we need Artificial Pollination if we have Multispecies Justice in the Anthropocene? Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 50-73. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.966.

Westgate, J., 2023. Corals, Geo-Sociality, and Anthropocene Dwelling. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 74-105. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.979.

Vieira, N., 2023. Whales Lost and Found. Rescuing a history of biodiversity loss in early modern Brazil. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 106-130. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.976.

Srivastava, S., 2023. Res(crip)ting the Gaze: Agency and the aesthetics of disability in ‘Animal’s People’. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 131-143. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.1127.

Melian-Morse, A., 2023. Teaching to Care for Land as Home: Thinking beyond the Anthropocene in environmental education. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 144-162. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.969.

Ressiore, A., & van de Pavert, M., 2023. Caring with the Non-Human: Reciprocity in market gardening. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 163-176. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.972.

Price, C., & Chao, S., 2023. Multispecies, More-Than-Human, Non-Human, Other-Than-Human: Reimagining idioms of animacy in an age of planetary unmaking. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), 177-193. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.1166.

Johnson, G.J., 2023. I’ve Seen the Future, and it Will Be: Editorial, Volume 10, Part 2. Exchanges: The Interdisciplinary Research Journal, 10(2), i-xii. DOI: 10.31273/eirj.v10i2.1340.

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Naturally, my great thanks to Catherine Price and Amy Gibbons as special issue lead and associate editor on this issue. Plus, thanks to my editors and reviewers who also helped us bring this issue to publication.

Should you be reading this and think ‘Could Exchanges help us publish a special issue?’ – please do get in touch! We are more than happy to talk you through the processes and offer advice, without any commitment. However, as past collaborators will tell you, it can be an enriching and rewarding experience for everyone involved!


November 10, 2022

Early–Stage Researchers – Special Issue Invitation Launched

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/special-issues

A new special issue project is launched, tying into a researcher developmental course.

Yesterday I had the pleasure of attending Warwick’s Leadership and Management Development Course on reflective practice for early-stage researchers. The course, which is being run three times this year aims to generate some discussion and exchange of experience between researchers who are early in their career and are looking to broaden their understanding of the wider research landscape. Yesterday’s session was focussed in on writing and publication, which was why I was there: to offer insights into the art of peer-reviewing and editing journals.

While only a relatively small cohort of delegates, there were some excellent and perceptive questions and insights shared, and I think considerable interest in what I had to say! The course will be running with two further researcher cohorts this academic year, and I’ll be popping up in each of these as well. It certainly is nice to interact with some scholars I’ve not met before, and who for once, aren’t directly linked to the IAS. I am also looking forward to learning more about new researchers’ perceptions of academic authorship and scholarly publications too.

Synergistically we’ve also partnered with the LMD [1] to launch a special issue call tied to this course. In it, delegates are being invited to submit critical reflections around their research practice inspired by or promoted by the course contents themselves. Naturally, we hope a few of the course participants might also get involved as associate editors for the issue too, so we’ll see how that develops over time. I suspect there will be some very interesting papers submitted to the issue on the basis of what I heard yesterday.

Special Issue - Early-Stage Researcher Reflections: [Anticipated Publication - 2023]
This special issue is devoted to participants within the three cohorts of the Warwick Leadership and Management Development course for developing early-stage researchers. Course delegates are being invited to submit critical reflections concerning their own research practice. These are expected to be inspired by their experiences, insights or considerations arising from the course contents and discussions with their peers. Manuscripts may opt to provide a holistic overview of the researchers’ experiences or choose to focus in on particular aspects of their life and work.

Find out more about all our past, present and future (!) special issues here:

https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/special-issues

My thanks to Dr Harriet Richmond of the LMD for the invitation to get involved in this course, and for proposing the special issue too!

Endnotes

[1] Which I now realise is also the same acronym as Life Model Decoy in the MCU


August 03, 2022

New Special Issue: The Lonely Nerd

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/issue/view/42

I am understandably delighted to announce that the latest issue of Exchanges is now live. This is our fourth special issue, and focuses in on experiences of lonely nerds around the world, along with explorations of their representation, perception and isolation within various media forms. I will confess it’s with a slightly heavy heart that I released this issue – mainly because it has been such a genuine pleasure to work with Ben and Filippo as the special issue leads. But, also because I’ve enjoyed many stimulating and enjoyable exchanges with many of the authors whose work appears in the issue too.

On the other hand, considering this issue started life with a conversation in November 2019, part of me is very grateful we have finally reached the finish line. In part because it releases the articles into the world, but mainly because after all this time it is great to have a little closure on the project. Only a little, because once I finish my promotional work on the issue launch, I move on to (hopefully) a number of podcast interviews with authors in the issue about their work. And after that, my focus is squarely returned to our next regular issue’s preparations as well.

Nevertheless, for this afternoon at least I’m going to back in the afterglow of the issue release and the lovely words of praise I’ve been receiving from some of the authors. Makes the job well worthwhile! Just a pity none of us are local so we could gather for a small celebratory drink or something as a capstone to the publication. Ah well, one day!

Meanwhile, to aid your reading, here’s a table of contents for the issue with DOI links to each and every article, along with the entire issue file too.

Volume 9 No 3 (2022) – Special Issue Lonely Nerd: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3

Table of Contents

Gareth J Johnson. Going Where My Heart Will Take Me: Editorial, Volume 9, Part 3. pp. i-xii. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.1186.

Filippo Cervelli & Benjamin Schaper. Socially Inept?: The perceived loneliness of nerds. pp. 1-10. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.946.

Benjamin Schaper. Conquering the Meatspace: The lonely nerd in David Fincher’s The Social Network (2010) and Baran bo Odar’s Who Am I (2014). pp. 11-29. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.866.

Janée Burkhalter. ‘Gus, don’t be the comma in Earth, Wind & Fire’: Understanding Psych’s (sometimes) lonely blerd Burton Guster. pp. 30-45. https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.869.

Alena Cicholewski: ‘A place where everybody is a legendary hero… and a total dork’: Representing the American nerd community as an antidote to loneliness in G. Willow Wilson’s Ms. Marvel Comics (2014-2019). pp. 46-61. https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.861.

Sharon Coleclough. So Many Ways to be an Outsider: ‘Nerdism’ and ethnicity as signifiers of otherness. pp. 62-83. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.859.

Rebecca Lewis. The Simultaneity of Loneliness and Popularity in Dear Evan Hansen. pp. 84-103. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.864.

Daniele Durante. From Misfit to Guide: Toward a corrective depiction of Otaku and Hikikomori in Japanese videogame Persona 5. pp. 104-123. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.854.

Natalia Rumak. Sherlock and Shārokku: ‘Nerdy’ detectives in the West and in the East. pp. 124-144. https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.860.

Kwasu David Tembo. Social and Spatial Representations of the Nerd in Donnie Darko. pp. 145-161. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.917.

Carolin Fleischer-Heininger. Loneliness as the New Human Condition in Murakami Ryū's In za miso sūpu: Otaku-ness, space, violence and sexuality. pp. 162-184. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.893.

Christopher Smith: Consumable Bodies, Consumable Self: The queer potential of otaku subjectivity in Kio Shimoku’s Genshiken. pp. 185-202. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.855.

Filippo Cervelli. Saved by the Nerd: Otaku and the space of family in Summer Wars. pp. 203-225. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31273/eirj.v9i3.887.


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