All 9 entries tagged Discourse

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June 22, 2022

Podcast: Chatting with https://open.spotify.com/episode/6HHuETdXCalvt1yz0zOMA2?si=Ik5OAv–nTQ–jmy8VDd

Writing about web page https://anchor.fm/exchangesias/episodes/In-Conversation-with-Francesca-Brunetti-e1k9v63

And we’re back with the second of our two recently recorded episodes of the Exchanges Discourse podcast. This time I’m in conversation with Francesca Brunetti, currently based at the ISI Florence, Italy but shortly moving to an exciting new post. Listen to the episode here:

> In Conversation with Francesca Brunetti

This episode we talk to scholar, artist and past-Exchanges author, Francesca Brunetti (ISI Florence, Italy), about her paper Delicious Bodies, Beautiful Food, Powerful Pleasure, which appeared in the most recent issue of the Exchanges journal (V9.2). Along the way we touch on desire and pleasure, food and sex, and cultural perceptions of the southern Italian women. We also talk about some of Francesca’s work in progress, alongside her advice for new authors too.

The Exchanges Discoursepodcast is available on Anchor.fm, Spotifyand most major podcast platforms.

My thanks to Francesca for coming on and talking with us. Obviously, if you’d like to be featured in a future episode, well the best way to do that is to be a featured author in Exchanges. Find out here how to submit your paper to us!


June 14, 2022

Podcast: Talking with Jon Braddy

Writing about web page https://anchor.fm/exchangesias/episodes/In-Conversation-with-Jon-Braddy-e1jstis

Yes, we're back with an all-new episode of the Exchanges Discourse podcast. It's been a bust few months thanks to bank holidays, the launch of the new issue and working on various special issue projects. Which has meant the podcast took a slightly back-seat for a couple of months. But the good news is, we're back and with a couple of author interviews to start us off again. Hopefully, there's a few more interesting episodes to follow - especially once we launch our next special issue of the journal. More on that in the coming month.

In the meantime, please enjoy my conversation with Jon about everything from the weather, through developing your writing with passion and the idea that publishing CAN and should be fun without diminishing the scholarship.

In Conversation with Jon Braddy (S03E06)

We talk with Jon Braddy, Florida Gulf Coast University, about his paper Utilizing the Octothorpe (#): Schizoanalytic cartographies recognized in War Games, which appeared in the most recent issue of the Exchanges journal (V9.2). Along the way, aside from contrasting the trans-Atlantic weather differences, we look at passion how it can serve to evolve your own academic voice within your writing. We also discuss some areas of mutual challenges for authors and editors of scholarly journals, and reflect on the value and process of peer-review.

The Exchanges Discourse podcast is available on Anchor.fm, Spotify and most major podcast platforms.

Our next episode was recorded this morning, so listen out for it next week.



April 06, 2022

Creating a metanarrative conversation within a journal issue

Writing about web page https://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk/index.php/exchanges/

How much does creating a conversation between articles in a journal volume rely on luck, authors or the editors themselves?

This morning I was interviewing one of my associate editors (hi Anna!) who had reached the end of her time with the journal. As I’ve probably mentioned in previous posts, I always like to run exit interviews with my editors to explore what they’ve learned, how they’ve grown and perhaps most importantly what were the challenges they faced. All of which feeds into my plans and support for the journal team going forward. The interviews are also a great point at which I can personally thank the editors for their efforts: literally without them we are nothing as a journal, so it’s always worth saying.

While we talked over various issues in our chat, one point today’s editor made concerned not being able to see the ‘whole’ journal as she was only working on a few papers. Hence, for an associate editor how the journal comes together is seen from a very ‘fragmentary’ perspective. I thought this was an interesting point, worth a few minutes’ reflection of my own. I must confess, how collections of articles become more than an assemblage of text and evolve into a conversation, where pieces almost speak to each other, can be an incredibly illusive element of the editorial process. For our regular issues there have been a few glorious, serendipitous moments where articles can be seen to resonate with each other, occasionally even between issues. I say ‘serendipitous’, as our regular issues comprise articles usually submitted and developed entirely in total isolation from each another. I will acknowledge how on a rare occasion we have pieces submitted which are responding to earlier texts, but although these are worthy contributions, they are the exceptions rather than the rule.

For our special issues though, there’s a much greater chance its articles will exist in some form of cogent metanarrative. The articles are often framed as outputs from an event, most notably as in our first three special issues for example, or may instead emerge from a call for contributions. For the former option this means while articles might have been finalised by authors in private, there’s been some degree of interchange and interaction ahead of their creation with their fellow contributors. All of which will have influenced their thinking and writing to a degree, making the appearance of threads of commonality or counterpoint in the prose more likely. For those responding to an open call though, I’ll acknowledge there’s going to be less immediate interrelationship within the texts.

Certainly, though, as editor-in-chief it’s also part of my role to maximise any resonance between individual articles too. This might be achieved through how they are assembled within the running order of the issue, but also most notably within my editorial overview of the issue’s contents too. It’s often when I’m writing this guide, as I am currently for issue 9(2) that I begin to identify some of the common threads of discussion and debate within the pieces.[1]

The benefits stemming from a well-curated and highlighted collection of articles has been one of the stronger arguments for the continuation of the journal as a form of scholarly publication. Rather than expecting readers to only use an article level accesses to specific texts, co-locating articles within a single journal issue, serves to enhance people’s awareness of other works of interest. Hence, a collection of thought from disparate writers, aggregated within a single volume, can potentially offer something more insightful as a whole than the individual components. Or at least that’s how the common argument goes.

I am perhaps in awe, and slightly jealous, of those journal editors who make this work look effortless though. For some perhaps it is easier due to the volume of texts they receive and publish far exceeds that of Exchanges: with more work to pick and choose from, and a likely greater regularity of publication, collating these pieces to form volumes with a stronger central narrative core becomes a less-complex achievement. It also forms a powerful incentive for readers and contributors alike to turn to their journals knowing the volume will contain multiple points of interest.

Then again, attempting to achieve such a narrative for a disciplinary title – rather than one trading in interdisciplinary contents such as ours – is also likely an easier, if not entirely facile, task too.

That said, coming up in the next issue of Exchanges will be a call for papers on a singular theme. I have high hopes this may well offer the creation of such a coherent discourse. Naturally, whether it succeeds or not I suspect will be largely down the coherency of the call that I write, but more than anything on the perceptions and scholarship of the issue’s contributors. Hence, we will have to see what fate, and our prodigious and generous authors, provide!

---

[1] Due for publication at the end of April '22


February 18, 2022

In Conversation with Huayi Huang

Writing about web page https://open.spotify.com/show/5amW8qMjCrUihAvtBq5ChM

This past month has seen the launch of two new episodes of the Exchanges Discourse companion podcast series chatting with past authors about their lives, work and publishing activities. The first, that with Elloit Cardozo, I highlighted in an earlier post. This time I’m pleased to bring you our next episode, an extended episode with Huayi Huang of the University of Edinburgh, UK.

In this podcast episode Huayi and myself discuss the concepts of routine dynamics, alongside offering some insight into the roles of early career researchers in society. As always, I also ask my guest to offer their personal insights and suggestions into publishing which are specifically tailored to be of interest to post-graduate and early career researchers.

Behind the scenes this was probably the longest recording I’ve done with one of our authors. What you tragically don’t get as part of the recording was the twenty minutes or so Huayi and I continued talking about issues of career development and the academy from an early career researcher’s perspective. Perhaps a shame to lose this content, but with such a generous guest as Huayi, I’d hope to invite him back to appear on a future episode I’m slowly fermenting in my head.

More on that as and when I get it off the ground. In the meantime, enjoy this new podcast episode – and I’ll hopefully be back in the next week or so with the next episode of the Exchanges Discourse – already recorded, but now just in need of post-production polishing!


February 01, 2022

In Conversation with Elloit Cardozo

Writing about web page https://open.spotify.com/episode/2DuQiVJGLoGmpms13QC8R1?si=STWSEzmdSTmkOxkyWsAWyg

And here's the second new episode of the podcast, with the last of our 2021 recorded sessions with past authors. An interesting discussion as we get into issues around setting up a special issue as well as the usual thoughts around the author's research and publication activities too.

In Conversation with Elloit Cardozo [14m 01s]

In this episode Elloit Cardozo talks about his research activities, especially as they relating to his recent paper ‘The Sagacity of Words’: Gandhi and 21st Century Hip Hop. Elloit discusses how the paper was partly inspired from desires to provide an easier route for younger school and university students to gain a greater understanding of the life and times of Gandhi. While deploying an analytical lens empowered through Hip-Hop music might seem an unusual approach to some readers, Elloit explores how it offered him a fresh and exciting way to explore the topic. Elloit also takes us into his current publishing plans, and how The Big Lebowski factors into them, before finishing by offering advice to other early career researchers looking towards publishing their first paper.

My thanks to Elloit for chatting with me, and please do share this episode with anyone you think might be interested.

I'll be recording two new episodes of the podcast with past authors next week, so there's plenty more audio content coming your way this February!


January 27, 2022

In Conversation with Mehdi Moharami

Writing about web page https://open.spotify.com/episode/328Dw23g71Z7s9Xjz4EWrA?si=LzTInMztQ5G0YNSgyzpGAg

Yes, Season 3 of the Exchanges Discourse starts here, with the first of two interviews recorded just before Christmas. In each one we chat to one of our past authors on the journal about their research and publication experiences.

In Conversation with Mehdi Moharami[16m30s]

In the first of our new season of episodes we talk to early career scholar, and recent Exchanges author, Mehdi Moharami (Monash University, Australia) about his research and publishing work. Focusing of the ethnographic piece written for the journal, exploring the lived and cultural experiences of language teachers based in Iran, we move on to examine advice on publishing for other first time authors or early career scholars.

My thanks for Mehdi for joining me in conversation. We'll be back next week with the second of our episodes!

Share and enjoy.


January 13, 2022

Looking Back at 2021: Most Popular Podcast Episodes

Writing about web page https://open.spotify.com/show/5amW8qMjCrUihAvtBq5ChM

We take a look back at the most popular episodes of the Exchanges Discourse podcast in the past twelve months

Happy new year, Exchanges readers. And what could be a better way to start the new year, than by sharing a couple of our most access, read and used items within our communities. First off, it’s our run down of the most popular episodes – based on listener statistics – for the Exchanges Discourse podcast. As we moved into this second year of the podcast there was an upswing in the number of episodes and content duration too. In fact, we produced 13 episodes in 2021 which lasted a grand total of 3hrs 33mins and 18 seconds. Which equates to fully two more episodes and over 90 minutes more content than the previous year. Hence, cheers all around to everyone who participated and helped make this happen!

So out of these 13 glorious episodes – which were the ones most beloved by our audience?

>Number 5 (audience share 9%): Introducing Volume 8.3 of Exchanges – a look back at the Spring 2021 issue of the journal.

>Number 4 (audience share 10%): A Conversation with…Doro Wiese. A chat with a past author, and Warwick scholar.

>Number 3 (audience share 12%): The Cultural Representations of Nerds – in Conversation with Filippo Cervelli & Ben Schaper – a special issue focus.

>Number 2 (audience share 13%): A Conversation with...Urmee Chakma. Talking with a past author about teaching English to speakers of other languages.

>Number 1 (audience share 19%): Conversations with…Associate Editors – a panel discussion exploring what working on Exchanges & its special issues means for early career scholars.

And you can freely listen to these and all our other episodes on Spotifyand Anchor.Fm

I am quite surprised to see one of my solo efforts, looking at a recent issue of the journal, in there by the skin of its teeth at number 5. I had rather assumed that listeners most preferred to hear guests, and while for the most part the rest of the top 5 hold this up, it is gratifying to know there is an audience for me talking (mostly) to myself.

For contrast - here are the most listened to episodes in 2020.

We have already two episodes recorded and pending editing for the new season of the podcast, which will be coming out over the next week or so – giving you something to look forward to already. Plus I’ve two further guests lined up for February, and maybe even something a little special…a live recorded podcast session with an audience. More on that idea if we can pull it together!

Next time though, I’ll share what were the 10 most downloaded papers in the journal last year. Stay tuned for that – next week! 


June 01, 2021

New episode: A Conversation with…M Onat Topal

Writing about web page https://anchor.fm/exchangesias/episodes/A-Conversation-withM-Onat-Topal-e11vufe

M Onat Topal and HostThe latest* episode of The Exchanges Discourse is now live. This time I'm in conversation with another of our recent authors on the journal about their publication, research and thoughts on academic publication. The episode touches on the challenges of 'trash' journals and conferences, alongside some of the other pitfalls for new authors.

A Conversation with…M Onat Topal

In this episode we discuss the article, ‘Use of Artificial Intelligence in Legal Technologies: A critical reflection’ and some of its implications with its lead author. As usual we delve into the guest’s current research and publishing activities, before closing with some advice for first time and new academic authors.

*18th if you're counting


April 23, 2021

In Conversation with…Urmee Chakma

Writing about web page https://anchor.fm/exchangesias/episodes/A-Conversation-with---Urmee-Chakma-evgqfv

Perfect for a Friday, here's an all new episode of the Exchanges Discourse podcast. This time I'm talking with doctoral candidate Urmee Chakma, from the Faculty of Education at Monash University about her recent publication with the Exchanges journal. We also talk about the challenges of teaching English to speakers of other languages, and her advice for authors approaching publication for the first time.

https://anchor.fm/exchangesias/episodes/A-Conversation-with---Urmee-Chakma-evgqfv

Enjoy!


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