April 28, 2017

Pest update from Wellesbourne

Between Tuesday and today we caught:

On 3 sticky traps in each of our carrot plots:

  • 109 carrot flies - overwintered carrots
  • 2 carrot flies - spring-sown carrots

In 4 water traps - 3 near our overwintered swede plot and 1 near some oil seed rape:

  • 23 male cabbage root flies and 2 females
  • 51 bean seed flies
  • 16 pollen beetles
  • 4 flea beetles

We also recovered 70 cabbage root fly eggs from the soil around 15 cauliflower plants.

We set up pheromone traps for silver Y moth, diamond-back moth and turnip moth on 18th April but none caught so far.


AHDB Aphid News

The latest edition of AHDB Aphid News has just been released.

  • Despite the cool conditions, the total number of aphids flying and species diversity have started to increase this bulletin week.
  • Peach–potato aphids were caught at four sites this bulletin week (Kirton 1, Hereford 1, Silwood 1 and Starcross 2), including first arrivals at two sites some two to three weeks earlier than forecast.
  • Willow ̶carrot aphids were caught at six sites across central and southern England. Three of these individuals were first arrivals (Hereford, Rothamsted and Writtle) and all three were close to the ten-year means. The first parsnip aphids (Cavariella theobaldi) of the year were caught this week (Rothamsted 2, Silwood 1, Wellesbourne 1, Writtle 3 and Wye 1).
  • The first small flushes of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae) and the black bean aphid (Aphis fabae) have also been caught this week.

Brassica aphids and virus News

The proportion of peach potato aphid (M. persicae) carrying Turnip yellows virus (TuYV)

Date

Type of trap

Numbers of M. persicae caught

% of those tested carrying TuYV

Wellesbourne, Warwickshire

10/4-16/4/2017

Suction trap

0

0%

19/4-24/4/2017

Yellow water traps

50

72%

-

-

Kirton, Lincolnshire

10/4-16/4/2017

Suction trap

0

0%

Spalding, Lincolnshire

19/4-24/4/2017

Yellow water traps

2

0%

-

-

Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), formerly known as Beet western yellows virus, is a very important pathogen of vegetable brassicas and oilseed rape. It is spread by the peach potato aphid (Myzus persicae).

This data is collected as part of project ‘Developing integrated approaches for pest and disease control in horticultural field crops’ with funding from the BBSRC Horticulture And Potato Initiative (HAPI).

Diana Katschnig and Angela Hambidge, Plant-Virus Interactions Group, University of Warwick; Alex Greenslade, Rothamsted Research & Rothamsted Insect Survey; Carl Sharp, Allium & Brassica Agronomy Ltd.


April 25, 2017

Pest update 25th April

Between Friday and today we caught:

On 3 sticky traps in our carrot plots:

  • 151 carrot flies
  • 1 Orthops spp.

In 4 water traps - 3 near our overwintered swede plot and 1 near some oil seed rape:

  • 68 male cabbage root flies and 7 females
  • 44 bean seed flies
  • 509 pollen beetles
  • 31 flea beetles
  • 12 cabbage stem weevils
  • 1 cabbage seed weevil
  • 2 cabbage stem flea beetle

We also recovered 57 cabbage root fly eggs from the soil around 15 cauliflower plants.

We set up pheromone traps for silver Y moth, diamond-back moth and turnip moth on 18th April but none caught so far.


April 21, 2017

AHDB Aphid News

The latest edition of AHDB Aphid News has just been published. Highlights relevant to vegetable and salad crops below:

  • A cool, dry and windy week has restricted aphid flight across much of the country, with the notable exception of Starcross in the South West. The forecast of frosts over the next week will likely limit aphid population growth on the ground. 
  • Four peach–potato aphids were caught this bulletin week in western England (Hereford 1 and Starcross 3).
  • No further willow ̶carrot aphids were caught this bulletin week. 
  • A single pea aphid was caught this week at Wye, it was a first arrival for this site and about three weeks earlier than the 10-year mean. 
  • No potato aphids, mealy cabbage aphids or black bean aphids have been caught so far this year. 
  • The shallot aphid (Myzus ascalonicus) remains the most numerous aphid species in our suction-trap samples to date

Pest update Friday 21st April

Between Tuesday and today we caught:

On 3 sticky traps in our carrot plots:

  • 99 carrot flies
  • 1 Orthops spp.

In 4 water traps - 3 near our overwintered swede plot and 1 near some oil seed rape:

  • 44 male cabbage root flies and 12 females
  • 42 bean seed flies
  • 374 pollen beetles
  • 21 flea beetles
  • 16 cabbage stem weevils
  • 1 cabbage stem flea beetle
  • 1 Orthops spp.

We also recovered 90 cabbage root fly eggs from the soil around 15 cauliflower plants.

We set up pheromone traps for silver Y moth, diamond-back moth and turnip moth on Tuesday but none caught so far.


April 20, 2017

Silver Y moths

A small number of silver Ys seen on the Cornish coast yesterday and reproted on Twitter!


April 18, 2017

Pest update Tuesday, 18th April

Between Thursday and today we caught:

On 3 sticky traps in our carrot plots:

  • 85 carrot flies
  • 1 Orthops spp.

In 4 water traps - 3 near our overwintered swede plot and 1 near some oil seed rape:

  • 45 male cabbage root flies and 9 females
  • 216 bean seed flies
  • 35 pollen beetles

We also recovered 47 cabbage root fly eggs from the soil around 15 cauliflower plants.


April 13, 2017

Pest update 13th April

Between Monday and today we caught:

On 3 sticky traps:

  • 9 carrot flies
  • 2 Orthops spp.

In 4 water traps - 3 near our overwintered swede plot and 1 near some oil seed rape:

  • 70 male cabbage root flies and 10 females
  • 212 bean seed flies
  • 34 pollen beetles
  • 2 flea beetles

We also recovered 16 cabbage root fly eggs from the soil around 15 cauliflower plants - our first eggs of the year.


AHDB Aphid News released

The latest edition of AHDB Aphid News has just been released for the week ending 9th April.

With regard to potential pest aphids of horticultural crops then suction trap captures were as follows:

  • A single peach–potato aphid was caught this bulletin week at Starcross, making three in the last 7 weeks at this site.
  • Single willow ̶ carrot aphids were caught at Broom’s Barn and Silwood, both were first arrivals and two to three weeks earlier than the 10-year means.
  • Single pea aphids were caught at Broom’s Barn and Silwood, both were first arrivals and three to five weeks earlier than the 10-year means.
  • No potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae), mealy cabbage aphids (Brevocoryne brassicae) or black bean aphids (Aphis fabae) have been caught so far this year.
  • The shallot aphid (Myzus ascalonicus) is the most numerous aphid species in our suction-trap samples to date.

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