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February 16, 2006

Modes of Writing: Notes After Workshop Week 7

1. Ideas for topics:
•Freedom of speech.
•Religious extremism.
•Environmental issues.
•Globalisation.
•History of the university.
•Media influence.
•Corporate Enterprise.
•Educational issues.
•Politics.
•Gender issues.
•Racial issues.
•Ethnicity.
•Immigration.
•Language.
•Europe.
•Terrorism.

2. Link to Pinter essay: here
Also you can watch a recorded version here


Modes of Writing: Reminder about the Final Portfolio

THE PORTFOLIO AND ESSAY

The final assignment is a portfolio of original writing and an essay, each of 4,000 words. Together they account for 60% of your final mark for the module. The portfolio is of your own creation, and may mix genres, but play to your strengths. The essay usually takes the pattern given below by Maureen Freely. All word counts are approximate!

Note: Please word-process all your work.
1. THE SUPER-PORTFOLIO

DEADLINE: MONDAY, WEEK 24
1. All work in the portfolio must be original and must have a word count of no less than 4,000 words. It can consist of poetry OR fiction OR Life Writing OR non-fictional prose OR it could combine two genres or three genres or four genres. The best portfolios tend to combine two to three genres. Submitting a 4,000 word portfolio of poetry would be exceptionally demanding! Play to your strengths. What you choose to submit is as much a mark of your discrimination as a writer as how well it has been written.

2. THE SUPER-ESSAY
DEADLINE: MONDAY, WEEK 24
The 'super essay' should consist of 4,000 words. We advise the following 'shape' for this essay.

THE ESSAY'S SHAPE
(With approximate word counts).
Note: This was written by Maureen Freely.

I. Portrait of the Artist in Early October (300 words). Describe yourself as you were then.

II. Have your ideas about poetry changed over the year? If so, how have they changed? If they haven’t changed, what are they? Give examples. (500 words)

III. How would you define autobiography? How would you define non-fiction? What sorts of autobiography/non-fiction interest you the most? Where would you draw the line between fiction and autobiography? Give examples. (500 words)

IV. Can fiction be more truthful than non-fiction? If so, why? If not, why not? What makes fiction ‘authentic?’ When has your writing felt ‘fake’ and when does it ring true? What can you conclude from this? Give examples. (500 words)

V. What is the difference between a formal essay and a personal essay. Give examples. (500 words)

VI. Tell me what you’ve learned about the following: (100 each)
1. point of view
2. voice
3. style
4. narrative framing
5. inventing characters
6. dialogue
7. investigation

VII. When you look at the writing you have done this year, what are your thoughts? Where would you like to go from here? (500 words)

VIII. Write an extended metaphor that describes how your imagination works. (500 words)


Modes of Writing: Outline

MODES OF WRITING
NON-FICTION

Unit 4 Outline

Weeks 17–20 will be spent on non-fictional prose taking in elements of:
1.Description and illustration.
2.Argument and persuasion.
3.Amplification.
4.Investigation.
5.Interviewing and profiling.

Each week you will be expected to research an aspect of your topic and you will present your findings and later your writings to the class LIVE. You will be expected to present your findings as if they are LIVE news and you will need to persuade your audience that your project is a subject worthy of investigation and of reading.

Outline
Week 7:Types of Articles, House Style and Audience
Week 8:Argument, Rhetoric, Persuasion
Week 9:Practicalities
Week 10: Presentations

Assignment

The product of the course will be an article in the high journalistic style of literary non-fiction, as typified by essays in the London Review of Books or The Guardian (Saturday). The subject will be something that directly affects university life.

Your submitted work will include: an investigation of 1,500 words and 500 word informal essay on why you chose the subject and what you were hoping to explore and prove.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: Monday, Week 21, 12 noon.
Research
You should also regularly read the book pages of major national newspapers especially the London Review of Books, Saturday Review section of The Guardian, also perhaps the review pages for The Independent, The Independent on Sunday, The Sunday Times, The Observer. These are available in the library adjacent to the issue desk. By studying these items, you can also gain a great deal of useful research for your final 'super-essay'. For the super-essay, also see The Paris Review Interviews (various editors and publishers; Library SRC) and Writers at Warwick tapes (Library SRC).


February 08, 2006

Modes Of Writing: Non–Fiction Prose: Outline

Unit 4 Outline

Weeks 17–20 will be spent on non-fictional prose taking in elements of:
1.Description and illustration.
2.Argument and persuasion.
3.Amplification.
4.Investigation.
5.Interviewing and profiling.

Each week you will be expected to research an aspect of your topic and you will present your findings and later your writings to the class LIVE. You will be expected to present your findings as if they are LIVE news and you will need to persuade your audience that your project is a subject worthy of investigation and of reading.

Outline
Week 7:Types of Articles, House Style and Audience
Week 8:Argument, Rhetoric, Persuasion
Week 9:Practicalities – Finding Information, Interviews
Week 10: Presentations

Assignment

The product of the course will be an article in the high journalistic style of literary non-fiction, as typified by essays in the London Review of Books or _The Guardian _(Saturday Review section). The subject will be something that directly affects university life.

Your submitted work will include: an investigation of 1,500 words and 500 word informal essay on why you chose the subject and what you were hoping to explore and prove.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: Monday, Week 21, 12 noon.

Research and Reading
You should also regularly read the book pages of major national newspapers especially the London Review of Books, Saturday Review section of The Guardian, and the review pages for The Independent, The Independent on Sunday, The Sunday Times, The Observer. These are available in the library adjacent to the issue desk. By studying these items, you can also gain a great deal of useful research for your final 'super-essay'. For the super-essay, also see The Paris Review Interviews (various editors and publishers; Library SRC) and Writers at Warwick tapes (Library SRC).


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Creative Research Blog

Please note that I also have a blog for ideas and research at: www.blogs.warwick.ac.uk/zoebrigley

Women Writing Rape


See this new blog set up to coincide with the symposium, Women Writing Rape: Literary and Theoretical Narratives of Sexual Violence

Practice of Poetry Seminar:

Thursdays 9 – 12 noon in the Mead Gallery, Warwick Art Centre

REMINDER: When bringing poems to be workshopped in class, it would be great to bring extra copies so that we can all see the poem on the page.

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