All entries for January 2007

January 25, 2007

Podcasting get together/workshop

There has been a lot of interest in podcasting around the University in the last 12 months for both elearning and communications.

There are many projects currently underway across the University examining how we can best use podcasts, whether audio or video, to enhance the way we deliver teaching and raise the profile of both departments and individuals.

On March 1st the Communications Office and eLab’s elearning team are hosting a half day workshop on podcasting.

We will be examining the practicalities of delivering podcasts for teaching and communications and exploring why you might want to start a podcasting programme. The aim is to show how communications and elearning are drawing together to deliver rich content to meet a number of key objectives.

Additionally, we would like to open up an invitation to share best practice, discuss opportunities and link up expertise from across the University.

If you would like to attend please contact me, Tom Abbott, either on 74474 or via t.abbott@warwick.ac.uk. This is intended for Warwick people.

A detailed agenda will be published soon, as will the location – hopefully Scarman House.


I'm a cartoon in the THES!

iCast and podcasts got a good write up in the THES today, plus most of the lead editorial – hooray!

On top of which, I get turned into a cartoon – is this the pinnacle of my short life? It’s down hill from here on in.


January 24, 2007

Blatant podcast pimp

Writing about web page http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/audio/?podcastItem=hamlet.mp3

I don’t often highlight particular podcasts but I have to mention the latest one on Women and Hamlet.

I found this discussion particuarly interesting – I might have to buy the book!


January 22, 2007

A good look at the future of journalism

Writing about web page http://www.nieman.harvard.edu/reports/06-4NRwinter/index.html

Interesting set of papers from the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard looking at the changing nature of journalism in the digital age.

There is an awful lot to digest here, but some provocative thoughts to consider.

The pace of change is frightening – keep your eyes on the edges!


January 03, 2007

Saddam the execution – the official movie

It’s interesting how the scandal around the mobile phone video of the execution of Saddam Hussein really highlights the problems for those seeking to control communications and messages in the modern era.

On the day of the execution an official video was released of a calm and controlled scene, only to be followed a day later by a mobile phone video which contradicted the official version with shouts, taunts and a somewhat chaotic mood.

It’s a simple example of how difficult it is for organisations to manage the news in the way they used to and how much control has been lost.

Is this a good thing? It’s easy to argue that it’s always better to tell the truth in these matters, but Saddam is an interesting case here in that the former version of events was less likely to stir up trouble than the latter. Was the Iraqi government justified in trying to create an impression of calm in the interests of a broader peace when the alternative would have been to run the risk of greater conflict.

My own feeling is that you have to deal with the truth. This case demonstrates that you can’t hide reality anymore – trusting a PR person to manipulate a situation or manufacture a reality is a risky stratgey when every bystander has a mobile phone and news networks are desperate for footage. The exercise has been an absolute disaster for the Iraqi government and most likely for the US and British as well.

On top of the misdirection and communication failures of Abu Graib, the Mirror photos, warblogs and the weight of content on the web perhaps we need to start trying to deal with reality rather than struggling to create and control a fiction.


January 02, 2007

Digg podcasting

Writing about web page http://digg.com/podcasts/view/education

The new Digg podcast service is interesting, taking the principles behind the normal Digg service and applying it to podcast content. It’s a simple mechanism for recommending and sharing content of interest.

Interesting that there are so few comments – perhaps podcasts are not immediate enough to excite comment in the way that text and video do. The discussion element is something I rack my brain about on a regular basis, but perhaps it’s the medium that stops people commenting.

Thanks to the 5 people who Dugg Warwick Podcasts and got us on the Up and Coming list for education – you can tell it’s early days when 5 votes gets you on a list!


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