All entries for Saturday 04 June 2011

June 04, 2011

SCT6 – Week 5 23 / may / 11

Lesson 1

·     All pupils can use a protractor to accurately measure angles

·     Most pupils can work out the relationship between the Interior angles of polygons

·     Some pupils can see that the exterior angles of any polygon add up to 360degrees.

WILT:

Pupil A

1.    Use a protractor to measure angles

2.    Exterior angles add up to 360 degrees

3.    Measure angles

Pupil B

Interior angles of polygons go up by 180 degrees because there is an extra triangle.

Pupil C

---

Lesson 2

To develop multiplication ability by using three different methods

1.    Grid method

2.    Diagonal method

3.    Long method

WILT:

Pupil A

I like the Grid method and diagonal method is good.

Pupil B

I like the diagonal method, it was new and I can do long multiplication correctly.

Pupil C

I can do it in my head

Lesson 3

·     All can recognise conversion graphs

·     Most can read conversion graphs

·     Some can use data to accurately draw conversion graphs

WILT:

Pupil A

1.    Follow the line on the conversion graph

2.    Swap things around e.g. 1 min 0.75 km

3.    Use a ruler

Pupil B

Today I made quite a few mistakes but then I fixed them.

Pupil C

You have to be careful when you are reading the graph to be accurate.

Last week, whilst working on Pie-charts I saw that pupils struggled with using protractors. Thinking about wanting to allow the pupils to tell me what they have discovered I created a task which allowed them to look at interior and exterior angles of regular polygons and practice their use of protractors. By the end of the lesson they were expected to tell me three things that they had discovered (along the lines of what the exterior angles add up to, what interior angles add up to….is there a link…).

This lesson went well and pupils worked in pairs to find the missing angles and wok out what they added up to…the plenary was especially successful as I was able to demonstrate the addition of triangles to illustrate how interior angles are related to the number of sides the polygon has and the pupils were very curious to see how this worked. They left with a ‘hmmm who knew’ look which did amuse me.

The multiplication lesson also worked very well as pupils were pleased with themselves when they were able to find the answers to long multiplication sums. I gave the history of the diagonal method, explaining that it originated from China and the peasants used it and they were quite impressed. I would have liked to have spent a bit more time explaining this but the class were restless enough with my talking. This lesson was appropriate and probably something I would use earlier in the year so that pupils get a strong foothold on how to multiply. By the end of the lesson pupils were choosing the method they preferred and it was good that they were exposed to a variety of methods. I saw that whilst some preferred the diagonal method, other worked with the grid, but the international pupils (Pupil B) would only use Long multiplication method. Interesting. 


SCT 6 – Week 4 16 / may / 11

Lesson 1

·     Reading and Drawing Pictograms

WILT:

Pupil A

Absent

Pupil B

I came half way through the lesson today but I knew what to do

Pupil C

In this work I did it incorrectly by using different pictures and not having a key showing that (*) = 2 people. =)

Lesson 2

·     Interpreting and Drawing Bar graphs

WILT:

Pupil A

1. The bars should be the same width and length.

2. There should be a title.

Pupil B

Today’s work was quite easy and I have learnt all the things that make a bar graph accurate.

Pupil C

I can do bar graphs

Lesson 3

·     All students can read Pie-charts (Level 5)

·     Some students can draw Pie-charts (Level 6)

WILT:

Pupil A

1.    How to do pie-charts

2.    Do more work

Pupil B

I know what makes a pie chart accurate. It shows the amount of different sections represented.

Pupil C

They not very hard but not very easy either. You must use a protractor every time or it wont be correct.

This week was interesting. I focused on making sure that all the pupils brought in pencils and rulers and that was a task in itself. Towards the end of the week, however, I had made progress and was pleased to see that the pupils were stopping me in the corridors to show me their rulers. What also worked well was that I threatened 3 friends of the most notorious pen-forgetter with detentions if the pen-forgetter didn’t bring his equipment. I knew I would have to follow through with this and was ready to, but they had sorted it out before they entered the class and I was pleased.

There is one pupil who missed about 4 weeks of school last term who has now come back into the class and has put me in a bit of a strange position. She comes in and pulls out a reading book, and spends the lesson reading. On one hand I am glad she is at least reading rather than throwing punches (as often happens), but she won’t do any maths. She works only if I stand over her and make her, and the minute I move away she starts reading. It is hard to maintain her as the class does need my help too. Maybe she will improve next week. Pie charts were successfully drawn, with only 3 pupils not managing to draw anything.

The progression of tasks this week moved the pupils on from Level 4 towards Level 6 work and I was pleased to see that the progress was evident.

The questions I was asked in class showed this to me straight away. At the start of the week pupils were easily accepting what I told them and answering questions, by the end they were asking me why and comparing the different methods of representing data. I didn’t have to prompt them much on this, and they themselves were suggesting when each type of graph would be useful. The No Hands Up worked well with this as those who weren’t pushing themselves as much were forced to participate. I felt that this achieved the target I set for myself last week in creating opportunities for pupils to make assertions themselves and me collating this to show the class their own ideas. 



My target:

present a variety of methods to pupils so that they can have a range of techniques to adapt to.


Target for 


Pupil A - to ensure pupil A gives an in depth detail of his 'WILT'

Pupil B - to keep making sure she asks questions and raises her curiosity. 

Pupil C - to make sure class collaboration happens.


SCT 6 Week 3 – 9 / may / 11

Lesson 1

·     All students can expand brackets

·     Most students can solve linear equations

·     Some can expand brackets and solve equations

Pupil A

1. How to add and subtract in algebra (in brackets)

2. Don’t get distracted

Pupil B

Today I did not really learn anything. I did not understand the last two questions, it was too complicated

Pupil C

Pupil C was wound up as soon as he entered the room and had to be removed.

Lesson 2

·     I know there are different types of averages

·     I can work out Range and Mode

·     I can work out the Median

·     I can work out the Mean

WILT:

Pupil A

I know there are different types of averages like mode is most often and range is largest - smallest

Pupil B

Today I have reached all of my learning objectives and the lesson went well. When there is two median you add them and then divide by 2!! Mean is add them all together and divide by how many numbers there are.

Pupil C

=D mean

=D median

=D range

Lesson 3

·     I can work out the Range and Mode

·     I can work out the Median

·     I can work out the Mean

WILT:

Pupil A

For Median put all the numbers in order and see which the middle number is.

Pupil B

It was easy lesson. I can work out range and mode and median and mean

Pupil C

Absent

Lesson 4

·     Finding the mean, mode, median and range of sets of data

WILT:

Pupil A

I can work out the mean with another pupil

Pupil B

I am quite comfortable doing grade C GCSE questions

Pupil C

I did GCSE work

This week saw us move away from Algebra and on to Averages.

The first lesson of the week was to tie all the algebra work together and was differentiated enough to allow those who understood the basics to move on to expanding brackets and solving equations at the same time, whilst allowing those who needed more practice on simple equation solving the time to practice and work through their difficulties.

Reflecting on the Algebra topic, the class did well. I have managed to create tasks that are differentiated enough to cater to the variety of needs the class has, and have found that this progression through tasks works well with the class. The majority of them enjoy striving to get to “worksheet 3” for example. 75% of the class were able to work on Level 6 questions and understood why they had to expand brackets, go on to collecting like terms and then solving. This was something I was pleased to see as this week I also taught a year 10 class the same thing and they struggled massively.

The averages topic took longer than I expected. I had been told the class needed a refresher on it and that they would adapt to it quite quickly. The reality turned out differently. Most of them couldn’t recall Median. However by the end of the week I was confident that the majority of the class could successfully use any form of average with data presented in different ways. This did not include continuous data. I am happy to move on to graphs next week.

When I asked the class to see if they could give me an example of a set of 5 numbers that had a mean of 5, I got a variety of correct answers from 16 pupils.

The trouble with this class that I am having is that the remaining 6 pupils regularly have reasons to leave the class at various points and utilize the help they get across the school to leave class and mess around.

Pupil A has worked well this week and refreshed his knowledge on averages. He was keen to ask questions and share his suggestions on when particular averages should be used. He has learnt himself that he works well in pairs and seemed to be really interested in the presentation of data and going on to see how it can be analysed.

Pupil B is always a diligent pupil and takes everything on like a sponge. I was pleased to see her helping her table group out. What I would like from her is a bit more questioning towards why certain procedures work in particular ways rather than just accepting the steps of what to do. I may try to see if I can create a lesson next week where the pupils can specifically tell me something new….

Pupil C managed to make noticeable progress and I found that algebra was a topic he worked well with. He worked especially well when questions were presented to him as GCSE questions. Considering he is on 3 school reports, he enjoys the praise and likes to tell his peers that he is working beyond them. Whilst this worked in the algebra topic, this did not transfer to the Averages topic. By the time it came for him to listen and pick up how to work out different types of averages and when to use each, he felt he was beyond it and stopped concentrating. When given questions that were slightly harder, he struggled and made simple mistakes. 



My target for next week:

try to encourage pupils to come up with reasons themselves as to why certain things happen, and collate these to present to the class, rather than presenting them as fact straight away


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