All entries for Monday 23 June 2008

June 23, 2008

I got the answer I was looking for

Follow-up to The World Is Flat from Ross' Blog

My bottom line is this: Open-source is an important flattener because it makes available for free many tools, from software to encyclopedias, that millions of people around the world would have had to buy in order to use, and because open-source network associations- with their open borders and come-one-come-all approach- can challenge hierarchical structures with a horizontal model of innovation that is clearly working in a growing number of areas. Apache and Linux have each helped to drive down costs of computing and Internet usage in way that are rofoundly flattening. This movement is not going away. Indeed, it may just be getting started- with a huge, growing appetite that could apply to many industries. As The Economist mused (June 19, 2004), “some zealots even argue that the open-source approach represents a new, post-capitalist model of production.” (Friedman, pp. 102-103)

I think this is a flattener that focuses on geeks or IT engineers, I dont mean it in a negative way. It is great that people develop programmes, I agree this is the beginning for them but I think the majority of us uses the information from the web and maybe publishes. The level Friedman is referring to (I undertand where he is coming from as I have an encounter with forums and chat when I was younger that have influenced the way I think about this) seems to be very advanced yet. That may be very applicable in the States or here amongst the group of software developers.

Summary


The World Is Flat

Writing about web page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_is_Flat

I have just read in a blog (Doctor Bonk) a bit about a book “The World is Flat” and I found interesting how those ideas relate to education. I did google the book and found this in wikipedia. I may get the book from the library. Friedman defined some “flatteners” and according to him these are leveling the world, from a business perspective. However here I have got the flatteners that I feel have some repercussions in education.

2: Netscape: Netscape and the Web broadened the audience for the Internet from its roots as a communications medium used primarily by ‘early adopters and geeks’ to something that made the Internet accessible to everyone from five-year-olds to ninety-five-year olds. (8/9/1995). The digitization that took place meant that everyday occurrences such as words, files, films, music and pictures could be accessed and manipulated on a computer screen by all people across the world.

Here there are many points, for example, there is a change in the meaning of “geek”. In my words, before it was someone who uses pcs, now it is someone who builds pcs. The fact that more children who have access to pcs are using them may bring some changes as well. This brought the discourse on “digital natives” and et. however, it is not possible to generalise yet. Not everybody is into pcs. It doesnt depend on age.

Finally, I have heard about a project a at national level focused on digitalising doctoral thesis. This is obviously very good for PhD students. Especially because it breaks the barriers and thesis from other universities across the UK can be accessed. At a local level, this has happened at the institute where upgrade papers are online on the web so PhD students have useful samples for their upgrade.

4: Open sourcing: Communities uploading and collaborating on online projects. Examples include open source software, blogs, and Wikipedia. Friedman considers the phenomenon “the most disruptive force of all.”

I would like to know why Friedman thinks that this is the most disruptive force of all. I dont think we are there yet, this may be the case in the United States but it is not happening here in the UK yet. I may have to borrow the book after all.

6: Offshoring: Outsourcing to another country or even another continent.

Phd students may be considered in business or economical terms as goods that can be taken to other countries with a need for what they are capable of doing.

9: In-forming: Google and other search engines are the prime example. “Never before in the history of the planet have so many people-on their own-had the ability to find so much information about so many things and about so many other people”, writes Friedman. The growth of search engines is tremendous; for example take Google, in which Friedman states that it is “now processing roughly one billion searches per day, up from 150 million just three years ago”.

This is what I consider is the most disruptive force in the UK at least, I think I agree with part of the criticisms about the book, Friedman has obviusly written from his perspective of American (?) and his context (New York). I agree with the comment that his book may not be inclusive. However it is nice to think that communities (all kinds of them) will have a place here in the future.

10: “The Steroids”: Personal digital devices like mobile phones, iPods, personal digital assistants, instant messaging, and voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP).

I wonder why he calls all these ICT developments “steroids”. Interesting. Is it because they surprise us and we dont know where they are coming from? Is it because they come in groups?


Write First

Writing about web page http://www.amazon.co.uk/Writing-Your-Dissertation-Fifteen-Minutes/dp/080504891X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214223147&sr=8-1

This book was suggested in a blog supporting medical students at Warwick. This has been the most useful book I have come across so far about writing. It is simple and engaging. It is an easy read.

Ruth Whitman’s words to me were very simple: “Write First”. By this she meant, make writing the highest priority in your life. But she also meant those words literally; that is, write before you do anything else in your day.

Today I planned to start early and after doing some bibs and bobs I got distracted with home bills. I realise now that it was difficult to come back to PhD work afterwards. I did eventually but it was hard to concentrate in to some reading.

I am not a morning person. I come from Peru, South America. We love to start things late in the day and finish very late at night, however this is working for me now and I would like to give this free bit of advice to any trouble and consumed by thought PhD student. Start in the morning.

I dont know if I am adjusting to Brittish patterns after 7 years of living in the UK. It just works naturally. I had to produce a project report and I worked on it in the mornings, it was not painful as research could be considered sometimes, I was happy and motivated. It was not difficult and I felt ideas were flowing. Keep it as the first things in the morning. Move your work around.


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