April 11, 2012

Speed Reading: Finality

Follow-up to Speed Reading: Reflections from Midgley, Christopher - Pointless twaddle and meaningless diatribes

Tutor was Han-Na Cha.

Likely I’ll continue with the nonlinearity, or at least try to, as part of the SQ3R thing that was recommended in the memory book.

Unlikely I’ll continue with the reading more slowly – in particular I’m not particularly sure how to read more slowly. I can’t consciously chunk it less, because this kills my understanding, and any slower speed seems to involve smaller chunks. I’ve come to reading a sentence, then trying to recite it to make sure I actually remembered it. This isn’t actually ‘reading slower’ but it’s close enough, I feel, to the original intent. This was a point that seemed like there should be an obvious way of doing it (surely it should be easier to read slowly instead of quickly?); but I can’t get it to work reasonably. I’ve developed a system that’s worked fairly well so far, and it comes easily to me, so I think I’ll stick with it until circumstances prove me wrong.

Reading symbols is part of doing mathematics so that’s not something I can ignore :D

Hmm, I put most (read: all) of my “aha!” moments for the extant action points into last week’s post..time for some other miscellaneous commentary.

I still feel it’s too easy to let my attention drift away from what I’m reading. On the plus side, I no longer wake up and realise I have no idea where I am – I just stop, dead. I found a few ways of getting around that. The first was timing myself, and reading for a fixed length of time, which I thought worked well until I found out I was somehow getting less done in a greater length of time than before timing. It did, however, get me to stop taking absurdly long breaks (the enjoyment returns are strictly diminishing after, say, 20 minutes off).

The other way was to give up on reading and try reciting what came before. If I can’t remember, that’s a hint to go back :). Otherwise it’ll improve retention without risk of boring further.


- One comment Not publicly viewable

  1. Han-na Cha

    Hi Chris,

    It’s good to read your candid final entry on this workshop. I’ve enjoyed reading on how you’ve tried it out and considered how to make it work for you.

    Sounds like you are forming your own technique of not getting bored with reading, whilst your reading. Keep going with that.

    You have completed the blogging requirements for this workshop and can use it towards your WSPA.

    17 Apr 2012, 16:57


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