All 5 entries tagged Research

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April 02, 2008

Web annotation applications for research

Writing about web page http://sharedcopy.com/

Web annotation applications allow you to annotate a web page and share the annotations with other people. Diigo does this, of course, but it also does so many other things.

I found SharedCopy is a quick and easy way to see what a simple annotation web application would do. It gives you a bookmarklet you can drag on to your browser, which will allow you to highlight text on the web page you are studying, stick comments and discussion threads on to it, and draw shapes on it. Then remember to save your annotations and you get a URL to their hosted copy of that web page with the overlay of your annotations, which you can then share with your collaborators or contributors. And all that for free and without even having to register for a SharedCopy account!

Although it is hard to tell whether the Gibeo project is still running, the site is still up and can help you to understand the development of this kind of services. Of course there exist many other web annotation systems.

Nevertheless I will continue exploring Diigo, since it seems quite useful for the researcher. It gives the impression of a sophisticated bookmarking service that could potentially become as community social as Facebook.

Diigo just now might be useful for a collaborative project involving commentary about web pages. However, researchers may find it cannot (yet) replace other research tools like Zotero, or even CiteULike.


November 22, 2007

Early evidence of Open Access citation advantage still useful

Writing about web page http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html

Does OA self-archiving of articles that are later published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals actually increase citation of these articles? Definitely yes and the body of evidence keeps growing and increasing in sophistication.

Steve Hitchcock rightly notes “citation analysis is specialised and difficult”. However, the “simple example” he then provides actually shows this is an understatement!

As the field of scientometrics develops and bibliometric studies become more specialised, it may also become more difficult for the non-statistician to understand the research conducted. This is why it is perhaps not a bad idea to keep referring to earlier studies if they are more digestible for the lay person.

A good starter would be this poster presentation (Brody et al., 2004) accompanied with this article (Harnad & Brody, 2004) and with this paper (Hajjem, Harnad, & Gingras, 2005) as the main course. Thankfully all these remain on the menu in Steve Hitchcock’s bibliography (Hitchcock 2004).

__

Brody, T., Stamerjohanns, H., Vallières, F., Harnad, S., Gingras, Y., and Oppenheim, C. (2004). The effect of Open Access on citation impact. Paper presented at the National Policies on Open Access (OA) Provision for University Research Output: an International meeting. Southampton, 19 February 2004

Hajjem, C., Harnad, S., and Gingras, Y. (2005). Ten-Year Cross-Disciplinary Comparison of the Growth of Open Access and How it Increases Research Citation Impact. Bulletin of the Technical Committee on Data Engineering, 28(4), 39-46.

Harnad, S., and Brody, T. (2004). Comparing the Impact of Open Access (OA) vs. Non-OA Articles in the Same Journals. D-Lib Magazine, 10(6).

Hitchcock, S. (first posted 15 September 2004). The effect of open access and downloads (‘hits’) on citation impact: a bibliography of studies


July 17, 2007

All the suppport for your research

Researcher support in academic libraries is a current interest of mine. I would like to hear about different models used in Universities anywhere in the world.

In particular I am interested in how a physical space in a library can integrate into one single hub or point of access all the research support services, including a virtual research environment, that researchers may need. By researchers I mean the whole range from Masters by Research and PhD students to Post-Doctoral and Research Fellows as well as the established academics.

This range of services is not limited to library services, or to the services provided by the institution for its researchers. I am sure there are already many universities where such ideas have developed and are successful.


April 17, 2007

Researchers' use of Academic Libraries and their Services

Writing about web page http://www.rin.ac.uk/projects-list

The latest RIN report (April 2006) Researchers’ use of Academic Libraries and their Services deserves careful analysis. It is a survey contrasting the views of academic librarians and researchers on the subject of how academic libraries do actually support research and how researchers interact with academic libraries.

Even though the report highlights, among other things, the challenge of making library materials findable for research, it is a different report from the earlier one (November 2006) Researchers and Discovery Services: behaviour, perception and needs.

The survey provides an average among a mix of institutions with very different profiles and priorities (72% of librarians surveyed work for “pre-1992” institutions and 24% work for “post-1992” institutions). For this reason I would recommend to read the appendix before the report itself.


March 28, 2007

Copac launched its new interface

Writing about web page http://www.copac.ac.uk/

Today Copac launched its new interface . The database itself has been moved on to XML.

XML enables search and display in non-roman scripts, including Cyrillic, Arabic and Chinese. When searching do bear in mind, however, that the database is yet to accrue records in those scripts – the current records still are those in transliteration.

The new Copac interface supports RSS feeds, allowing you to set an alert for any particular search you have made. This is very welcome at a time when the Zetoc RSS feeds are only for the table of contents of a particular journal, but not for a keyword search across all indexed journals.

In addition Copac bibliographic records can now be downloaded/emailed also in these formats: BibTeX, BibTeXML, and XML MODS. There is also a user friendly Search History facility.

Note that the Home button is the “Copac” logo in the signature at the bottom of each page. Needless to say?


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