April 11, 2012

e–assessment – interesting video

Writing about web page http://www.teachersmedia.co.uk/videos/e-assessment-where-next

This is interesting. Good for the e-assessment question. 6 years old now - we should be so much further on.


http://www.teachersmedia.co.uk/videos/e-assessment-where-next




- 4 comments by 3 or more people Not publicly viewable

  1. Sara Hattersley

    Yes, I agree that the pace of change does not seem to have been as great as we might have expected – a review of the literature shows that using mobile devices and e-portfolios is still ‘innovative’ in some respects. I wonder if it’s not the changes to technology that we are ‘waiting for’ though, but the adoption of these methods and approaches. I am sure there is wider use of e-portfolios, blogs and mobile technologies these days for educational assessment and learning…perhaps it takes time to catch on and for people to feel confident enough to use it.

    13 Apr 2012, 16:30

  2. Juliet Nickels

    I’m fairly sure that it’s an issue with the ‘digital immigrant’ generation and also the interesting mismatch we always get between what’s assumed to be for the ‘education’ market and whats available in the real world. Hence we have teachers who are still not entirely digitally literate (some of my colleagues never touch a computer out of school) and pupils who are immersed in video game technology. We’ve had high quality interactivity for well over a decade in the games arena and there is enormous potential for this in education but it’s very slow in coming. I’m sure there’s a degree of reluctance amongst some for anything ‘serious’ to be that much ‘fun’ too.

    14 Apr 2012, 15:11

  3. Assessment online has distinct advantages. After moderating work at a centre/school/college it is liberating to return back to base, enter all the data and write a report instantly. It makes paperwork redundant, however there still is the requirement for hard copies of everything, as back up.

    Being standardised online is more problematic, one loses the constructive dialogue between assessors and especially in the Arts, the exemplar photographs have to be a good representation. Assessing online may not give the scale of the piece or the texture and quality of a fashion garment, for example.

    However, students are embracing technologies, but there is a gap of acceptance in a more formal sense, but it does seem to be happening. For instance, look at David Hockney using his ipad for drawings of the countryside. (Exhibition at the Royal Academy).Students can draw on ipads or other devices, send them all over the world and can get instant assessment/critiques etc of their work from whoever they wish to choose! Amazing!

    19 Apr 2012, 16:32

  4. Love the idea of linking the technology to learning – but still very wary of “distraction” – depth of learning issues – really dependant on learner ability/motivation. Youtube, facebook emails etc the outside world can be a very “shiny place” in a classroom. have read various articles – virtues of rewiring the brain – multitasking capabilities – however lots of US papers disagree – Cornell investigating depth of knowledge have reported that these new skills are not always what they seem. As a means of research and communication – brilliant – possibilities endless – but whether learners are looking that far ahead I am not sure – sometimes the work produced by my 16+ cohort is more akin to grazing – quick superficial response instead of delving further. I know this is no different from the students who did their homework on the back of the bus on the morning of a deadline but somehow it seems more wasteful that they haven’t utilised the amazing resources available.

    Looking at a future “Knowledge Society” it is never going to be about retaining facts/figures but equally learners have to disseminate good from bad – trustworthy sources from those who look to skew the facts. For many years we have relied on publishers, educators and experts, the outcry of alternative “histories” merely one example of where reliability and validity are exorcised in public. The web and its Svengali hold on the naive could be a danger, powerful print – albeit on line – can give authenticity to those who seek to misinform. Our learners need new skills – it could be argued higher order levels of debate and questioning – even at a very young age.

    The freedom of the net is its strength but may also be its weakness.

    23 Apr 2012, 11:17


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