January 28, 2006

Autopoiesis and Deleuze

The autopoiesis theory of Maturana and Varela can surely be linked tp D&G's philosophy. Structural plasticity can be seen as the creation of differences.

Varela worked in Paris from 1980 until his death in 2003, I think. I have found no indications that Varela was knwon to Deleuze nor vice versa.

I have elaborated the implications of the biology and epistemology of autopoiesis for psychology as a science. It appeared in booklet. I can send it to you. It dates from 1986.

For a psychology of nomadisation based on D&G, see my website:
link
and click 'English', then 'available texts'.


- 2 comments by 1 or more people Not publicly viewable

  1. Still learning how to use this site. Had never even read a blog till recently. Eric Rossel mentions autopoiesis. Varela certainly knew of Deleuze and was on close terms with Guattari. Guattari of course develops the concept of autopoiesis in 'Chaosmosis'.

    29 Jan 2006, 01:10

  2. eric rosseel

    Thank you, Paul. Will look for Chaosmosis!

    29 Jan 2006, 02:30


Add a comment

You are not allowed to comment on this entry as it has restricted commenting permissions.

January 2006

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
|  Today  | Feb
                  1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31               

Search this blog

Most recent comments

  • thank you didn't find that out before. i am registered now, hope i'll be of any use to you. by mettler on this entry
  • If you wish to access the podcasts fill in the membership form at link You will then receive a login… by on this entry
  • I'm a former student of Alliez as he teached in vienna at the academy… by mettler on this entry
  • too bad that those are not Public!! why then put them on the blog and make them searchable! by mettler on this entry
  • Darren, I know nothing about this; through your posting I am very interested in Zepke's statement. I… by on this entry

Blog archive

Loading…
Not signed in
Sign in

Powered by BlogBuilder
© MMXXI