All 5 entries tagged Coursework

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April 09, 2006

Term 2 recap – what I learnt

Design of Information Structures

The lectures varied from useful to uninteresting to ancient Babylonian, but mostly uninteresting. I think I understand the concepts well enough, but they went over a large number of abstract data types that I'm not sure how we'll be tested on.

The coursework was easy enough. It was less interesting than the Programming for Computer Scientists coursework, but it made up for that a bit by not walking us through every step.

Mathematics for Computer Scientists II

I cannot remember what we covered in this module. A bad sign, I suspect. But at the time, it made sense, so I'm sure it's just buried at the back of my head.

Professional Skills

Why should computer scientists have to write essays? It's silly and ridiculous. Almost as silly and ridiculous as teaching essay skills in the same module as Unix. I've so far handed in a suprisingly good factsheet, an absolutely appalling article critique, and a persuasive essay of unknown goodness (probably not much).

The lectures were dull, but I went to them all, so that means that all the knowledge is hiding away in my brain, ready to be accessed at a moment's notice.

Introduction to Quantitive Economics

Macroeconomics is like Microeconomics, only with a different lecturer. And less maths. There were lots of weird graphs.

Computer Organisation and Architecture

The lectures remained mysteriously sleep-inducing, but we had practical labs this term. They were more interesting, especially when sleep-deprived. The last three weeks of labs required me and James to work together to make a game of Pong, using an oscilloscope as an output device. The first two weeks involved a lot of blunders, a lot of confusion, and a lot of doubt as to our ability to finish. The final week involved a miraculous last minute victory over the hardware by me, and an excellent game of Pong created by James (all in one night, without any way of testing it).

There was also some coursework due on the last day of term, but that was easy.


February 09, 2006

Stunning revelation #264058

I should never let myself choose between watching Buffy and working on my factsheet due in on Friday.

February 02, 2006

My day

Today has been productive.

I have:

Got my coursework, which became more interesting when it was explained that we aren't allowed to use any of the Java built-in list classes.

Started my coursework.

Signed for a house that's within 15 minutes of campus (ha at you, Leamington Spa), with Louise and two people I've met twice.

Discovered that the A* search algorithm is basically Dijkstra's algorithm, only the "value" of a node is equal to the cost of getting there plus the estimated cost of getting to the target, instead of just the cost of getting there.

Counting all times past midnight as part of today, I had an excellent discussion with Hennell.

And perhaps most importantly, I demonstrated to someone that their tin opener will actually work, so long as you use it the right way.


December 21, 2005

Term 1 recap – what I learnt

I had five modules last term.

Programming for Computer Scientists

Taught by the great Stephen Jarvis. This was basically an introduction to Java programming.

I picked Java up quickly, and knew all the stuff to do with Objects/Classes from A-level Computing. There was some new stuff towards the end, but none of it was difficult.

I made several robot controllers, including a final one which I was very pleased with. They got me 100% on both of the courseworks. There was also a test in the middle of term that I scored highly on. The courseworks and the test together are worth 40% of the overall mark.

Mathematics for Computer Scientists I

Lots of maths, all based on boolean logic and set theory. Relations, functions, graphs and probability, with some induction and some infinite sets.

We did four problem sheets, each worth 2% (just for handing in). Problem sheet 1 was randomly chosen to be marked, and will be worth 12%. I guess we get our mark for that when we go back.

Professional Skills

This module covers three areas, and we cover one area each term. This term was supposedly an introduction to Unix, but was generally laughable.

In one lecture, we were told about the ECDL. In another, we were told that OpenOffice.org exists. There were also some lectures attempting to teach Bash, but nobody who didn't already know the material picked anything up from them.

There was a badly defined assignment, for which the automatic tests given online were wrong and unreliable. Despite this, I got 100% on it, which gets me 30% of the overall module mark.

Introduction to Quantitive Economics

This term covered microeconomics, and next term we'll cover macroeconomics. Or the other way round. Not much of the material really sunk in. It probably didn't help that I missed a couple of the lectures, either.

Despite that, I got 70% on the first class test and 80% on the second. I still don't think I understand the material, but I'm unlikely to put too much effort into changing that situation.

Computer Organisation and Architecture

This started halfway through the term, and continues through term 2. So far we've covered binary stuff and logic stuff, some of which is new, and some of which is stuff I know backwards. We just started assembly language.

We haven't done any tests or anything, but next term we have lab sessions. I'm not entirely sure what they involve.


October 22, 2005

Interesting.

Today's lesson: don't redirect the output of sed to the file it's working on.

For reasons I don't entirely understand, it will wipe the file!

Especially don't do this if you're doing it inside a for statement looping through all the files of your coursework.


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After a hiatus of several years, I’ve started blogging again at blog.draknek.org.

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