All entries for March 2008

March 30, 2008

David Lean (1908 – 1991)


David Lean (Croydon 1908 - 1991)

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David Lean filming This Happy Breed

David Lean filming the funfair sequence of This Happy Breed


Introduction  


David Lean was the son of Quaker parents and as such the cinema was forbidden territory on religious grounds. Lean disobeyed his parents and saw the Hound of the Baskervilles (1921) and was instantly won over to cinema. Lean entered the film business in 1927.

David Lean Editing

Throughout his career David Lean was closely involved with editing

Lean concentrated on editing whilst closely observing how directors worked, he nevertheless laregly avoided making the ‘quota quickies’ as he was concerned that these wouldn't help his career. He quickly gained the reputation for being the best editor in the country working on Pygmalion (1938), and Powell and Pressburger’s 49th Parallel (1941). Lean then worked with Noel Coward on In Which We Serve (1942). Lean then made Blithe Spirit (1945) a Coward play which Coward felt he had not made the best of.

Leans Brief Encounter

Celia Johnson as Laura Jesson & Trevor Howard as Dr. Alec Harvey from David Lean's Brief Encounter (1945).

Brief Encounter (1945) was based upon a one act play by Coward. It had a disastrous preview which had the audience in hysterics nevertheless the film has now become a classic.It can however be seen as a very conservative film as its basic message is part of an overall post-war message that women should get back to their prewar positions in society following the much freer moral milieu of wartime Britian especially in London and the big cities. 


Kevin Brownlow argues that Lean’s two Dickens adaptations of Great Expectations (1946) and Oliver Twist (1948) are still regarded as the finest among all British films. Unsurprisingly American critics in particular complained that the representation of Fagin was deeply anti-semitic and was similar to much Nazi anti-pre-war propaganda. They were so effective that the filkm wasn't released immediately and had to be edited before its eventual release. Lean's defence was that the looks of the character were modelled on the original illustrations for the text by Cruickshank and that furthermore as a Quaker he didn't have any notion of what anti-semitism was. This is a little hard to swallow from somebody who had an astute and acute visual awareness. There can have been few adults in 1948 who were unaware of the realities of the 'Holocaust' and at best this representation could be considered as insensitive. Who is to say that Cruickshank wasn't anti-Semitic in any case?

fagin_in_oliver_twist_web.jpg


Alec Guiness as Fagin on the right in Lean's Oliver Twist (1948)


Passionate Friends (1948) followed. Madelaine (1949) by comparison fared rather les well being seen by many as cold tributes to his third wife. In the 1950s he progressed through The Sound Barrier (1952), to Bridge Over the River Kwai (1957 UK) gaining several Oscars including best picture and best director. In 1962 he made Lawrence of Arabia which also received many awards and is considered by many as a masterpiece. This was followed in 1965 by Dr. Zhivago which received public support through the box office despite many reservations from critics.

Sarah miles as Ryans Daughter

Sarah Miles in Ryan's Daughter (1970)

Ryan’s Daughter (1970) was seen as a very old fashioned picture and was badly received by critics although it can now be seen as interesting in its representation of Irish resistance to British rule. In 1984 He made Passage to India which gained critical plaudits and academy recognition. He died just before shooting on Nostromo was about to start. In the August editionof sight & Sound Nick James argues that it was Lean that was the grandfather of the British 'Heritage Film' making specific reference to Passage to India (1984). Arguably Lean's contributions to heritage cinema are embedded in most of his cinematic output. Blithe Spirit, Brief Encounter, seem to be infused with a sense of nostalgia a sense of a mythical golden age which was somehow lost. Most of them show a sense of anxiety with the processes of change and a loss of the notions of fairness and fairplay which Powell & Pressburger had hearlity dismissed in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp. 



Filmography

Money for Speed (1933). Directed Bernard Vorhaus. (David Lean Editor)

The Ghost Camera (1933). Directed Bernard Vorhaus. (Editor David Lean)

As You Like It (1937). Directed Paul Czinner (David Lean Editor)

Pygmalion (1938). Directed Anthony Asquith (David Lean Editor)

49th Parallel (1941). Directed Powell & Pressburger (David Lean Editor)

One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1942). Directed Powell & Pressbuger (David Lean Editor)

In Which We Serve (1942). Directed David Lean & Noël Coward

This Happy Breed (1944). Directed David Lean. [First official credit as sole director]

Blithe Spirit (1945. Directed David Lean

Brief Encounter (1945). Directed David Lean

Great Expectations (1946). Directed David Lean

Oliver Twist (1948). Directed David Lean

The Passionate Friends (1948). Directed David Lean

Madelaine (1949). Directed David Lean

The Sound Barrier (1952). Directed David Lean

Hobson's Choice (1953). directed David Lean

Summer Madness (1955). Directed David Lean

The Bridge On the River Kwai (1957). Directed David Lean

Lawrence of Arabia (1962). Directed David Lean

Doctor Zhivago (1965). Directed David Lean

Ryan's Daughter (1970). Directed David Lean

Passage to India (1984). Directed by David Lean

Webliography 

Screenonline biography of David Lean  

British Film Institute (BFI) David Lean Film Restoration Project

BFI David Lean Restoration This Happy Breed


Bibliography 

Sight and Sound August 2008. Nick James David Lean special feature Part II

Sight and Sound July 2008. Nick James David Lean special feature Part I


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Anthony Asquith (1902–1968)


Anthony Asquith (1902-1968)


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Anthony Asquith Helen Wilson
Anthony Asquith by Helen Wilson in the National Portrait Gallery



Introduction

Anthony Asquith was born in 1902 whose father Herbert  Asquith became the Liberal Prime Minister of the UK from 1908-1916. He gained the nickname of 'Puffin' and was educated at Winchester and Oxford. Drazin notes Asquith's enthusiasm with film as an undergraduate when he sometimes saw up to three films a day.

Upon leaving university he went to Los Angeles for about six months where he came into contact with many of the leading figures in the film industry. On his return to the UK he was determined to enter the film business which wasn't then consider a 'respectable'career for somebody of his background as Drazin notes:

At the time it was an extraordinary aspiration for someone of his class to have, the cinema generally being frowned upon as a rather tawdry diversion for the masses... . (Drazin 2007 p 187)



Early Years in the Industry

He went to work with Bruce Woolfe for British Instructional Films which was a company formed in 1919 that specialised in documentary reconstructions of World War 1 as well as a series of natural history documentaries. In 1925 Asquith was so embedded in film culture he became a founding member of the London Film Society and was enthusiastic about all the latest films from Germany, Russia etc. In 1926 he joined Woolfe at the Stoll Film Company in Cricklewood as a general assistant.  Asquith was to direct 4 short films in the late 1920s. His first sound film was Tell England (1931). Asquith joined Gainsborugh Films in 1932 and worked on both screenwriting and directing. In 1935 he joined Korda's London Films directing Moscow Nights in 1935. In 1937 he became President of the recently formed Association of Cine Technicians. He held this position until 1968 when he died of cancer in February whilst working on a film.

The recently released Cottage on Dartmoor (1929) from BFI has been regarded by many as providing the evidence that at this stage in his career Asquith was at least as good as if not better than Hitchcock.


Pygmalion

Pygmalion

Asquith's breakthrough film was Pygmalion (1938) on which George Bernard Shaw himself worked on the script. It gained a nomination for Best Picture at the Academy Awards and gained Oscars for adaptation and its screenpaly. It was Shaw who won the latter. Asquith's next film French Without Tears (1940) was the first of ten films which he directed in collaboration with Terence Rattigan the playwright.

Asquith During the War

Asquith's Wartime output was prolific it encompassed straightforward war stories such as We Dive at Dawn, Spy Thriller propaganda such as Cottage to Let (1941), comedy as in Quiet Wedding (1941)and also the well-known Gainsborough melodrama Fanny by Gaslight (1944).


Phyllis Calvert and Margretta Scott in Fanny by Gaslight


Phyllis Calvert and Margretta Scott in Fanny by Gaslight (1944)

Asquith's Postwar Output

After the war Asquith continued to make films on a regular basis of around one per year. He made several films which Terence Rattigan had scripted including Rattigan's most successful plays The Winslow Boy (1948) and The Browning Version (1951).

Browning Version 1

The Browning Version

Asquith also continued to make films from the British literary repertoire such as The Importance of Being Earnest (1952). Asquith worked in a number of genres and ended up working on large budget co-productions with US companies. Despite promising beginnings Asquith never became a director who own powerful vision came through as something of an auteur unlike his contemporary Alfred Hitchcock. Asquith has been considered as more of a metteur en scene.

Importance of Being Earnest

From Asquith 1952 version of The Importance of Being Earnest


Filmography

External Links to many of these films can be found under Key films of The Second World War and British Cinema and Society Chronology 1939-1951


The Browning Version (1951)

The Winslow Boy (1948)

While the Sun Shines (1947)

The Way to the Stars (1945)

Fanny by Gaslight (1944)

Two Fathers (1944)

The Demi-Paradise (1943)

We Dive at Dawn (1943)

Uncensored (1942)

Cottage to Let (1941) Not yet open

Quiet Wedding (1941)

Freedom Radio (1941)

Rush Hour (1941)

French Without Tears (1940)

Channel Incident (1940)

Pygmalion (1938)

A Cottage on Dartmoor (1929)




Webliography 

Screenonline biography of Anthony Asquith


Geoffrey McNab on Asquith: Guardian 2003


Screenonline: Asquith (1952) The Importance of Being Earnest


Select Bibliography 

Caughie, John with Rockett, Kevin. 1996. The Companion to British and Irish Cinema. London: Cassells

Drazin, Charles. 2007. The Finest Years: British Cinema of the 1940s. London: I. B. Tauris



Return to British Directors (Non-Contemporary) Hub page



British Directors (Non–Contemporary) Hub Page

British Directors (Non-Contemporary) Hub Page


For current or recently passed away British Film Directors please go to the Contemporary British Directors Hub Page.


Introduction


This page is designed to allow visitors to access information on a range of past British diectors and where appropriate informational hubs and critiques of specific films as these are developed.  The links are both internal and external ones


Non-Contemporary British Film Directors






Anderson, Lindsay (1923-1994)

Lindsay Anderson

Lindsay Anderson (Above)


Asquith, Anthony (1902-1968)

Anthony Asquith

Anthony Asquith  (Above)

Boulting, John (1913-1985)

John Boulting

John Boulting


Boulting, Roy (1913-2001)

Roy and John Boulting 2

Roy and John Boulting (Above)


Box Muriel (1905 - 1991)

Muriel Box

Muriel Box (Above)

Cavalcanti, Alberto (Brazilian born cosmopolitan 1897-1982)

Alberto Cavalcanti

Alberto Cavalcanti (Above)

Clayton, Jack (1921-1995)



Craigie, Jill (1911-1999) 


Jill Craigie with Husband Michael Foot

Jill Craigie with Husband Michael Foot (Above)


Crighton, Charles (1910-1999)



Deardon, Basil (1911-1971)

Douglas, Bill (1937-1991)

Dupont, E.A. (1891-1956)

Forbes, Bryan (1926-)

Frend, Charles (1909-1977)

Gilliat, Sidney (1908-1994)

John Grierson (1898-1972) 

Grierson, Ruby (1904-1940)

Hamer, Robert (1911-1963)

Hamilton, Guy (1922-)

Jennings, Humphrey (1907-1950)

Korda, Alexander (1893-1956)

Lean, David  (1908 - 1991)

David Lean on Great Expectations

David Lean on set

Lee, Jack (1913-2002)

Lee Thompson, J. (1914-2002)

Lester, Richard (US 1932-)

Losey, Joe (US but made many important films in Britain 1909 - 1984) 

Mackendrick, Alexander (1912-1993)

Mander, Kay (1915-)  

Montagu, Ivor (1904-1984)

Powell, Michael (1905-1990)

Pressburger, Emeric (1902-1988)

Reed, Carol (1906-1976)

Reisz, Karel (1926-2002)

Richardson, Tony

Tony Richardson

Tony Richardson (Above)

Roeg, Nicolas (1928-)

Rotha, Paul (1907-1984)

Russell, Ken (1927-)

Schlesinger, John (1926-2003)

Toye, Wendy (1917 - )

Watkins, Peter (1935-)

Young, Terence (1915-1994)


Webliography

For a useful range of biographical information also see the Screenonline Directors in British and Irish Cinema  


Textual Analysis OCR. Check list

Textual Analysis Exam OCR Media

Below is table which can act as checklist for revision of the action adventure film extract. It includes a wide range of shots and camera devices. It is unlikely that everything will be in one four to five minute extract.  

Table of Moving Image Textual Analysis Terms  

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Shot type

Minute 1

Minute 2

Minute 3

Minute 4

Minute 5

ELS






LS






MS






Plan Americain






MCU






CU






ECU






Shot reverse Shot






Over the shoulder






High angle






Low angle






Tracking Shot






Dollying






Zoom in






Reverse Zoom






Pan






Whip Pan






Tilt up






Tilt down






Aerial Shot






Underwater shot






POV shot






Eyeline Match






Sound

///////////////////

////////////////////

////////////////////

/////////////////////

////////////////////

Diegetic






Non Diegetic






Synchronous






Non Synchrounous






Transitions

///////////////////

/////////////////////

///////////////////

/////////////////////

////////////////////

Cut






Wipe






Superimpositions






Fade out / Fade in






Ellipsis


























March 29, 2008

Cities and Social Change DD201 Dayschool 2008

Cities and Social Change DD201 Dayschool 2008

Cities, The Networked Society and resisting the Space of Flows

Introduction

Let’s think about Cities historically in terms of their position in the world and in terms of how they functioned.

Historically we can think of Athens / Rome / Carthage / Florence / London / Paris / Vienna / Berlin / New York / San Francisco / Los Angeles / Tokyo

Now over half the people in the World live in Cities and they seem to be changing faster than ever before.  

The emergence of “New Super-Cities” : Mexico City,  Sao Paolo with many more emergent in China and South East Asia. By 2050 we are looking at cities with populations of over 50 million people. 

Tate Modern logo

This Tate Modern hyperlink above will take you to the Tate Modern exhibition of 2007 on global cities. When you arrive there check out the flash video which is also possible to download.

Favela in Brazil

Paraisópolis Favela in Sāo Paulo, Brazil 2005

I remember this image above especially well from when I visited the exhibition. The juxtaposition of wealth and power in immediate proximity to poverty stricken areas is particularly noticeable. It was in Brazil that the first gated cities were designed to protect the superwealthy inhabitants. Now a common mode of transport in and out of them is by helicopter. So there are many helicopter pads in these areas. Bullet proof cars are quite normal.

Above you can make out tennis courts and a swimming pool with exoctically designed luxury flats only a few metres away (and a very high wall - maybe hi-tech wall!)

Cities then, are centres of wealth and power as well as poverty and social exclusion. Have things changed radically since Engels' time we are led to ask ourselves? Here he describes Manchester in the 1840s: 

The town itself is peculiarly built , so that a person may live in it for years, and go in and out daily without coming into contact with a working people's quarter or even with workers, that is so long as he confines himself to his business or to pleasure walks. (Engels 1987 / 1845, pp85 cited Social change ed Jordan p 40) 

The Increasing Size of Global Cities

The following quotations are taken from the Tate Modern Exhibition on the global city 2007 from the "Size" section.

The Greater Tokyo area in the Kanto region now accommodates over 34 million people in a consistently dense and multi-centred urban region that is well served by an integrated system of trains, underground and buses, used by nearly 80% of daily commuters.

Sprawling across a high plateau framed by mountains and volcanoes, Mexico City has expanded tenfold in both population and area since 1940. With a population of 18 million plus, the city region generates nearly a quarter of Mexico's wealth, attracting people – many of them young – from the rest of the country to the Aztecs' original 'floating city'.

Sao Paulo is Brazil’s largest and richest city, with a metropolitan region the size of Los Angeles or Shanghai. Its population has nearly doubled in the past 45 years, and growth in the last decade was 9.2%. As the country’s financial capital, with a constituency the size of some European countries, Sao Paulo plays a key role in national politics.

Size Isn't Everything 

Despite the fact that cities in the developing world are far outstripping the size of global cities such as London and New York these cities along with Tokyo remain the global hubs that dominate the present day world as Manuel Castells has argued. With the increasing pace of globalisation and the deregulation of markets which accompamied this process Castells sees cities as being arranged into a global hierarchy which reflects the underlying shift of contempory capitalism to be organised as a networked / informational society.

New York, London, Tokyo are the world's most important financial centres. Here it is important to note that Hong Kong's stock exchange is becoming increasingly important as China's economy continues to expand at a phenomenal rate.  Here intensification of the processes of capitalism take place.  The space of flows described by Castells trades vast amounts of money every single day far in excess of the value of the physical goods travelling around the world on the same day. 

What is the Space of Flows?  

The space of flows is an essential component of the Networked Society which Castells argues characterises the current phase of capitalist development. In different phaeses of capitalist development time and space have been radically reconstructed in order to allow change to take place:  

The network society is a social order embodying a logic which Castells characterizes as the `space of flows' in contrast to the historically created institutions and organizations of the space of places which characterized industrial society in both its capitalist and statist variants. (Simon Bromley Review of Castells Radical Philosophy)

The historical and social development of the network society, according to Castells, is rooted in a new, global socio-economic structure of informational capitalism. To characterize this socio-economic structure, Castells argues, we must focus on both its (capitalist) mode of production and what he terms its (informational) mode of development or technological system. (ibid)

Castells takes for granted that much of the logic of contemporary global society is capitalist: capitalist restructuring in response to the worldwide economic crisis of the 1970s played a central role in shaping the development of societies, both nationally and globally, including the formation of the informational mode of development itself; the purpose of this capitalist restructuring at the most general level has been to escape from those social, cultural and political controls placed upon the economy in the era of essentially nationally based industrial capitalism (ibid)

Time and space in the space of flows as conceived of by Castells is a space of organisational elites who are operating the global network which has come about as a result of globalisation.  This  operates within a  space of Timeless Time.

What is Timeless Time?

Castells notes that many sociologists and social geographers have discussed the ways in which clock time gradually took over space and society. Wher Giddens talked about Time - Space distanciation (the ability to communicate over greater distance faster) as modernity developed so David Harvey discusses the notion of Time-Space compression. In this formulation time becomes a part of the intensification of the processes of capitalism so that more profit can be extracted. Castells' notion of timeless time delineates the time of the networked society which allows both of the above processes to take place simulataneously. Thus the notion of real-time (now-time) can happen globally. This happens in the space of flows and can't necessarily be understood or clearly recognised within the space of places:

What I call timeless time is only the emerging, dominant form of social time in the networked society, as the space of flows doesn't negate the existence of places. It is precisely my argument that social domination is exercised throughtthe selective inclusion and exclusion of functions and people in different temporal and spatial frames. (Castells Rise of the Networked Society p 434).




Cities as Technopole in the Networked Society

Franke and Ham point out the importance of the technopole as a part of the process of creating a networked society:

High-technology-led industrial milieux of innovation, which are called ‘technopoles’ come in a variety of urban formats. In most countries, the leading technopoles are contained in the leading metropolitan areas. (Franke and Ham see link below)

Currently despite the massively growing power of China's economy  it still isn't a key player in the 'space of flows', precisely because it is the beneficiary of technology transfer rather than being innovative.

Castells notes that the Space of Flows isn't simply cyberspace although this is an important component of the whole concept. Rather the space of flows comprises of networks of interaction however specific areas such as banking or arts and culture will organise their own specific space of flows.

Castells argues that a space of flows operates on a logic of nodes and hubs. For Castells a node is somwhere like Wall Street which structures connections and activities in a key area.  Hubs are communication sites such as airports. What characterises them differnetly is that they are dependent upon the whole network for thier position. 

The space of flows is also about the space for the social actors. These can be residential spaces near the nodes or 'global corridors of social segregation separating these corridors from the surrounding places around the globe'.  VIP suite, virtual offices and international hotels are the examples Castells uses to describe these in the Global Resistance Reader.

The fourth componet of the space of flows is the realm of electronic spaces of communication such as websites whether interactive or not.

Dominant activities are organised around the logic of the space of flows which can be understood as something different to the space of places. Place is increasingly fragmented and localised in relation to the space of flows. 

Spaces of Resistance / Grassroots

People are increasingly a part of the space of flows and from this springs resistance. Networks of solidarity are organised through the internet. News of opression comes through the internet. 

Increasingly people are organising knowledge construction and  dissemination through the internet. Wikipedia is of course a fantastic example of global cooperation with regard to this. When Castells was writing about grassroots resistance in 1999 Web 2.0 hadn't been invented. Web 2.0 is the world of Wikis and blogs, information sharing and social network sites. These may well be forming the basis of what many at the start of the era of the World Wide Web were hoping would become an electronic public space.

Webliography

Franke and Ham: Castells and the Space of Flows

Here the concept of social theory through the work of Castells is strongly critiqued:

Peter Abell and Diane Reyniers: On the Failure of Social Theory 


March 25, 2008

Lifestyle "Celebrity" and Advertising

Lifestyle "Celebrity" and Advertising

Return to the Lifestyle Hub

Introduction

Elsewhere in the blog it has been argued that lifestyle magazines are an important part of an overall field of discourses which encourage a culture of consumption. This culture of consumption is based upon an increasing aestheticisation of life and the links to personal identity. People often start to believe that if they buy a product that is linked to a sporting 'personality' for example they can identify and be identified with them.

Celebrity, Branding & Advertising

This kind of pressure can be particularly important working on younger people and what can encourage this is a culture of "celebrity".  Celebrity is frequently when a particular individual frequently a sporting 'star' (personality might be too strong a word when including people who can barely string a sentence together). They can aslo be film stars or leading actors in popular TV series. Whilst the reality is that they are no often any more clever (frequently less) they have been proved to be quite good at something. This has then been hyped up by skillful branding agencies , public relations companies and individual agents. Linking rising stars to consumer products is often an expensive form of branding for the product but when the sporting star is at the top of his / her game this link can be beneficial to both. 

Beckham

Arecent survey in schools shows the power these ideas can have on naive younger people. As this BBC story from December 2007 reports arguably the effects are very powerful:

Children see some 10,000 TV adverts a year and recognise 400 brands by age 10, Children's Secretary Ed Balls says.

The numbers of children at school who are strongly influenced by the culture of celebrity is alarming as this BBC report from 14th of March 2008 notes:

Children's educational aspirations risk being damaged by the cult of celebrity, teachers' leaders have warned.

Some 60% of teachers said their pupils most aspired to be David Beckham, in a survey for the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL). More than a third said pupils wanted to be famous for the sake of being famous. Some 32% of the 304 teachers quizzed said their pupils modelled themselves on heiress Paris Hilton.

Paris Hilton Leaves Jail

As a spoilt rich kid allowed to what she liked she is cleary a good "role model". Here she is pictured coming out of jail after being incarcerated for ignoring a drink driving ban! (BBC June 2007). Hilton is a case of being famous for wait for it...... being famous. (Duh!!!!)

Activities

  1. Identify in your own lifestyle magazines the advertised products which are part of major brands.
  2. How many of them are associated with with Celebrities / Stars?
  3. Which ones?

March 24, 2008

Lifestyle Magazines Hub Page

Lifestyle Magazines Hub Page


Introduction  


This page is a hub page for your Lifestyle magazines unit component of textual analysis. As new pages are developed links will be placed here in order to help you navigate to relevant pages on this blog.


What is a Lifestyle Magazine?

The Secrets of Magazine Cover Design  

Lifestyel Magazines and Branding

Grazia Magazine

Advertising and Magazines 

Lifestyle, Celebrity and Advertising

Magazines and Print Publishing  

Glossary of Magazine Terms  

The Magazine Industry  

Magazine Ownership and Control in the UK

ACORN Marketing classification for targeting advertising



Lifetyle Magazines & Branding

Lifestyle Magazines and Branding  

Return to Lifestyle Magazines Hub  

If one applies the categories of lifestyle applied to consumption as discussed above then it is important to have role models to help generate the desire to consume. The generation of the desire to consume goes beyond what might normally be expected of people in that it can encourage people to aspire to certain ways of living that can easily be reached provided one is prepared to spend money. It then is a matter of how the individual is prepared to spend that money. Magazines and other forms of media which can encourage the branding of goods are an extremely important mechanism for this.  

What is Branding?


There are many different definitions of a brand, the most effective description however, is that a brand is a name or symbol that is commonly known to identify a company or it’s products and separate them from the competition.

A well-known brand is generally regarded as one that people will recognise, often even if they do not know about the company or its products/services. These are usually the businesses name or the name of a product, although it can also include the name of a feature or style of a product.
Wolff Olins is a major branding company. Check out this page to see some of the future for branding. you should make sure you check out the TED video linked to the page. It really does do what it says on the box. (It does seem to be an image of what Web 3.0 might be as well ).
An Activity
  1. When you have suitably recovered think about the sponsorship and branding of the TED talks.
  2. How do you think sponsorship of TED can help build and maintain the brand of the company doing the sponsoring?

The overall ‘branding’ of a company or product can also stretch to a logo, symbol, or even design features (E.g.: Regularly used colours or layouts, such as red and white for Coca Cola.) that identify the company or its products/services. A lifestyle magazine itself becomes a brand in order to distinguish itself from other lifestyle magazines. Usually these magazines will have very tightly defined target markets and audiences. 

An example of powerful branding is Nike:
The Nike brand name is known throughout the world. Large numbers of people can identify the name and logo even if they have never bought any of their products.
However, not only is the company name a brand, but the logo (The ‘tick’ symbol) is also a strong piece of branding in its own right. The majority of people that are aware of the company can also identify it (or its products) from this symbol alone.
The sports clothing and running shoe company Adidas a competitor of Nike is well known for using three stripes on its range of products. This design feature branding allows people to identify their products, even if the Adidas brand name and logo is not present. 
How Branding Can  Benefit  Business

(i) Recognition and Loyalty

The main benefit of branding is that customers are much more likely to remember a business. A strong brand name and logo/image helps to keep a company image in the mind of  potential customers.

If a company sells products that are often bought on impulse, a customer recognising your brand could mean the difference between no-sale and a sale. This is very important in the world of clothing for example.
Even if the customer was not aware of a particular product, if they trust a brand, they are likely to buy a new or unfamiliar product. If  customers are  happy with a companies products or services, a brand can help to build customer loyalty across  a company.   Apple is a good example of a company who seeks to brand itself well in  the world of computers and also  items such as iPods  and now the iPhone.

(ii) Image of Size
A strong brand will project an image of a large and established business to your potential customers. People usually associate branding with larger businesses that have the money to spend on advertising and promotion. Effective branding,  can make a business appear to be much bigger and more important than it really is.

An image of size and establishment can be especially important when a customer wants reassurance that a company will still be around in a few years time.

(iii) Image of Quality

A strong brand projects an image of high quality. Many people see the brand as a part of a product or service that helps to show its quality and value. good branding also increase the social caché. iPods are more popular than Creative Zens partially because of branding.

A strong arguement for branding says that if a person is shown two or more identical products, only one of which is branded; they will almost always believe the branded item is higher quality. As a result they are prepared to pay a premium for this product.

If you can create effective branding, then over time the image of quality in your business will usually go up. Of course, branding cannot replace good quality, and bad publicity will damage a brand (and your businesses image), especially if it continues over a long period of time.
(iv) Image of Experience and Reliability

A strong brand creates an image of an established business that has been around for long enough to become well known. succcess breeds success.  A branded business is more likely to be seen as experienced in designing their products or providing services. As a result they will generally be seen as more reliable and trustworthy than an unbranded business. Many people also believe that a business would be hesitant to put their brand name on something that was of poor quality.  
        
(v) Multiple Products

If your business has a strong brand, it allows you to link together several different products or ranges. You can put your brand name on every product or service you sell, meaning that customers for one product will be more likely to buy another product from you.
For Example:

Sony sells a range of electronic consumer products laptop computers, music equipment, games consoles, camcorders, cameras, DVD players, mobile phones, and etc all under the Sony brand name.

Activities

Please feel free to use the comments box at the end of this posting to develop the discussion 
  • Please identify three well known brands from your two lifestyle magazines.
  • Now research these brands and print off examples where relevant of how they build their brand in other areas of print and non-print media
  • Where branding is done via broadcast technologies identify which channels the branding is done on and when they are broadcast. 
Things you should identify during this activity.
  1. Name of the brand
  2. Which products are being promoted
  3. How the brand is being promoted over and above the specific product
  4. Who the target audience is (gender / age/ ethnicity etc)
  5. What kind of aspirations are being linked to the brand
  6. Comment on how well you think the brand in question is managing to achieve its aims

Lifestyle Magazines and the Discourse of Consumption

You will by now have recognised the importance of lifestyle magazines as part of an interrelated discourse of consumption. By this I mean a whole field of activities which work effectively together to encourage people to consume as much as they possibly can.  


March 23, 2008

G.W. Pabst (1885–1967)

G.W. Pabst (1885-1967)

Return to Weimar Directors Hub Page

Filmography  (Weimar period)

This listing is taken from the Deutsche Film Portal. Not all links are theirs.

. 1932
.
. Die Herrin von Atlantis
Regie
.
. 1932/1933
.
. Don Quichotte
Regie
.
. 1932/1933
.
. Don Quixote
Regie
.
. 1932
.
. L'Atlantide
Regie
.
. 1932
.
. The Mistress of Atlantis
Regie
.
.

.
. 1931
.
. La tragédie de la mine
Regie
.
. 1930/1931
.
. Die 3-Groschen-Oper
Regie
.
. 1930/1931
.
. L'opera de quat'sous
Regie
.
. 1930
.
. Moral um Mitternacht
Künstlerische Oberleitung
.
. 1930
.
. Skandal um Eva
Regie
.
. 1930
.
. Westfront 1918
Regie
.
. 1929
.
. Die weiße Hölle vom Piz Palü
Regie
.
. 1929
.
. Tagebuch einer Verlorenen
Produzent, Regie
.
. 1928
.
. Abwege
Regie, Schnitt
.
. 1928/1929
.
. Die Büchse der Pandora
Regie
.
. 1927
.
. Die Liebe der Jeanne Ney
Regie, Schnitt
.
. 1926
.
. Man spielt nicht mit der Liebe
Regie, Schnitt
.
. 1925
.
. Die freudlose Gasse
Regie, Schnitt
.
. 1925/1926
.
. Geheimnisse einer Seele
Regie
.
. 1924
.
. Gräfin Donelli
Regie
.
.

.
. 1922/1923
.
. Der Schatz
Regie
.
. 1922
.
. Luise Millerin
Drehbuch, Regie-Assistenz
.
. 1921/1922
.
. Der Taugenichts
Drehbuch, Regie-Assistenz
.
. 1921
.
. Im Banne der Kralle
Darsteller, Produzent

Webliography


Scholarly work on Pabst

Senses of Cinema site on The Threepenny Opera


Joe May (1880–1954)

Joe May (1880-1954)

Filmography

This listing is taken from the Deutsche Film Portal. Currently all links are their's with the exception of Asphalt.  

.
. 1933
.
. Tout pour l'amour
Director
.
. 1932/1933
.
. Ein Lied für Dich
Director
.
. 1932
.
. Hochzeitsreise zu Dritt
Creative consultant
.
. 1932
.
. Voyage de noces
Creative consultant
.
. 1931
.
. ...und das ist die Hauptsache
Director,Producer,Production manager
.
. 1931/1932
.
. Zwei in einem Auto
Production manager,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1930
.
. Ihre Majestät die Liebe
Production manager,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1930
.
. Son altesse l'amour
Creative consultant,Co-Producer
.
.
. 1929/1930
.
. Der unsterbliche Lump
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1929/1930
.
. Die letzte Kompagnie
Producer
.
.
. 1928/1929
.
. Asphalt
Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1928
.
. Heimkehr
Director,Screenplay,Editing
.
.
. 1928
.
. Ungarische Rhapsodie
Screenplay
.
.
. 1927/1928
.
. Die Durchgängerin
Production manager,Producer
.
.
. 1926
.
. Dagfin
Director,Producer,Screenplay
.
.

.
. 1926
.
. Derby. Ein Ausschnitt aus der Welt des Trabersports
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1926
.
. Staatsanwalt Jordan
Producer
.
.
. 1924/1925
.
. Der Farmer aus Texas
Director,Producer,Screenplay
.
. 1924
.
. Die Liebesbriefe der Baronin von S...
Producer
.
.
. 1923/1924
.
. Der geheime Agent
Producer
.
.
. 1922/1923
.
. Tragödie der Liebe [1-teilig]
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1922/1923
.
. Tragödie der Liebe. 1. Teil
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1922/1923
.
. Tragödie der Liebe. 2. Teil
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1922/1923
.
. Tragödie der Liebe. 3. Teil
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1922/1923
.
. Tragödie der Liebe. 4. Teil
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1921
.
. Am Webstuhl der Zeit. Dramatisches Zeitbild aus schweren Tagen in 6 Teilen
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1921
.
. Das indische Grabmal (2 Teile)
Director,Producer
.
.
. 1921
.
. Der Tiger von Eschnapur
Director,Producer
.
.
. 1921
.
. Die Erbin von Tordis
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1921
.
. Die Sendung des Yoghi
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1921
.
. Ilona
Producer
.
.
. 1921/1922
.
. Scheine des Todes
Creative consultant,Producer
.
.
. 1921
.
. Tobias Buntschuh
Creative consultant,Producer
.
.
. 1920
.
. Das wandernde Bild
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.

.
. 1920/1921
.
. Der Leidensweg der Inge Krafft
Producer,Screenplay,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1920-1921
.
. Die Frauen vom Gnadenstein
Creative consultant,Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1920
.
. Die Legende von der heiligen Simplicia
Director,Producer
.
.
. 1920
.
. Die Schuld der Lavinia Morland
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1920/1921
.
. Junge Mama. 5 lustige Akte
Creative consultant,Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1919
.
. Der Amönenhof
Producer
.
.
. 1919
.
. Der Henker von Sankt Marien
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1919
.
. Der blaue Drachen
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1919
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 1. Teil: Die Freundin des gelben Mannes
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1919
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 2. Teil: Die Geschichte der Maud Gregaards
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1919
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 3. Teil: Der Rabbi von Kuan-Fu
Director,Screenplay,Producer
.
.
. 1919
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 4. Teil: König Makombe
Producer,Screenplay,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1919/1920
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 5. Teil: Ophir, die Stadt der Vergangenheit
Screenplay,Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1919/1920
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 6. Teil: Die Frau mit den Milliarden
Producer,Screenplay,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1919/1920
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 7. Teil: Die Wohltäterin der Menschheit
Producer,Screenplay,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1919/1920
.
. Die Herrin der Welt. 8. Teil: Die Rache der Maud Fergusson
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1919
.
. Fräulein Zahnarzt
Producer,Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1918
.
. Das Auge des Götzen
Creative consultant,Producer
.
.
. 1918
.
. Das Geheimnis der Cecilienhütte
Creative consultant
.
.
. 1918
.
. Das rollende Hotel
Creative consultant,Producer
.
.
. 1918/1919
.
. Der Muff
Creative consultant,Producer
.
.
. 1918
.
. Die Bettelgräfin
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1918
.
. Die Krone von Palma
Creative consultant,Producer
.
.
. 1918
.
. Die Ratte
Producer,Creative consultant,Screenplay
.
.
. 1918/1919
.
. Die närrische Fabrik
Creative consultant,Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1918
.
. Die platonische Ehe
Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1918
.
. Diplomaten
Producer,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1918
.
. Fünf Minuten zu spät
Creative consultant,Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1918
.
. Ihr großes Geheimnis
Screenplay,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1918
.
. Opfer
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1918/1919
.
. Veritas vincit (Die Wahrheit siegt!). Eine Filmtrilogie
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1918
.
. Wogen des Schicksals
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1917
.
. Das Klima von Vancourt
Screenplay,Producer,Director
.
.
. 1917
.
. Der Onyxknopf
Director,Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1917/1918
.
. Der lebendige Tote
Creative consultant,Screenplay,Producer
.
.
. 1917
.
. Der schwarze Chauffeur
Director,Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1917
.
. Die Hochzeit im Excentric-Club
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1917
.
. Die Kaukasierin
Screenplay,Producer,Director
.
.
. 1917
.
. Die Liebe der Hetty Raymond
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1917
.
. Ehre
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1917
.
. Ein Lichtstrahl im Dunkel
Producer,Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1917
.
. Hilde Warren und der Tod
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1917
.
. Krähen fliegen um den Turm
Screenplay,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1917
.
. Sein bester Freund
Producer,Screenplay,Creative consultant
.
.
. 1916
.
. Arme Eva Maria
Screenplay,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1916
.
. Das rätselhafte Inserat
Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1916
.
. Der Floh-Zirkus
Producer
.
.
. 1916
.
. Des Vaters letzter Wille
Producer,Director
.
.
. 1916/1917
.
. Die Silhouette des Teufels
Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1916
.
. Die Stieftöchter
Producer
.
.
. 1916/1917
.
. Die leere Wasserflasche
Producer,Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1916
.
. Ein Blatt Papier
Director,Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1916
.
. Ein einsam Grab
Producer,Screenplay,Set design
.
.
. 1916
.
. Nebel und Sonne
Screenplay,Producer,Director
.
.
. 1916
.
. Wie ich Detektiv wurde
Producer,Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1915
.
. Charly, der Wunderaffe
Director,Screenplay
.
.
. 1915
.
. Das Gesetz der Mine
Screenplay,Producer,Director
.
.
. 1915
.
. Der Geheimsekretär
Screenplay,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1915
.
. Der ewige Friede. Ein Ausgestoßener. 2. Teil
Screenplay
.
.
. 1915
.
. Die Gespensteruhr
Screenplay,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1915
.
. Die Sünde der Helga Arndt
Screenplay,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1915
.
. In der Nacht...
Producer,Screenplay
.
.
. 1915
.
. Sein schwierigster Fall
Screenplay,Producer,Director
.
.
. 1915
.
. Violette Rosen
Director
.
.
. 1914
.
. Das Panzergewölbe
Screenplay,Director,Producer
.
.
. 1914
.
. Der Mann im Keller
Director
.
.
. 1914
.
. Der Spuk im Hause des Professors
Director
.
.
. 1914
.
. Der geheimnisvolle Nachtschatten
Production manager
.
.
. 1913/1914
.
. Das Fischermädchen von Manholm
Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1913
.
. Das Werk
Production manager
.
.
. 1913
.
. Das verschleierte Bild von Groß-Kleindorf
Production manager,Director
.
.
. 1913
.
. Die Mona Lisa von Groß-Kleindorf
Production manager,Director
.
.
. 1913/1914
.
. Die geheimnisvolle Villa
Director
.
.
. 1913
.
. Die unheilbringende Perle
Production manager,Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1913
.
. Ein Ausgestoßener. 1. Der junge Chef
Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1913
.
. Entsagungen
Director
.
.
. 1913
.
. Geschwister
Production manager
.
.
. 1913
.
. Heimat und Fremde
Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1913
.
. Verhängnis
Production manager
.
.
. 1912
.
. In der Tiefe des Schachtes
Screenplay,Director
.
.
. 1912
.
. Iwo der Bucklige. 1. EP: Vorgluten des Balkankrieges
Cast,Director
.
.
. 1912
.
. Vorgluten des Balkanbrandes
Director,Screenplay
.
. 1911
.
. Die Fahrt nach Hamburg
Director


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