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January 18, 2013

Build your brand to find a job

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Bottle Wouldn’t it be great if you could make yourself different to all the other students that are going for the same job as you? Make your target employer aware you’re looking for a job? Make your skills and experience even more attractive to potential employers? How can this be done? Well, the answer lies in building your personal brand.

People as brands

When we think of brands companies like Nike, Apple and Starbucks come to mind. These huge corporations build brands to obtain certain benefits. To make themselves different, to raise brand awareness, the attract customers and charge premium prices to name a few. Can you see some parallels between your objectives and a brand?

The next time you’re in the supermarket look at the row jammed packed with bottled water. Water is a commodity but the good branding folk at Evian get you thinking about ‘youth’ whilst at Volvic they’re all about ‘volcanicity’ and volcanic energy. It’s water. Yes there may be some subtle taste differences but for the most part water is a very standardised product that has, via branding, being differentiated (oh and priced at a premium too). Humans are not standardised. They’re all wonderfully unique. If you can brand water you can brand people. No question about that. Just look at Richard Branson, Barrack Obama and David Beckham. They all have very strong personal brands.

What's your brand?

  1. Grab a piece of paper and draw a table with two columns. The left column should be titled “Words that describe me”. The right column should be “Words that describe my (target employer)”
  2. In the left column note down about five words you would use to describe yourself. Don’t rush. Take your time. This is important. Are you caring, creative, competitive, bold, daring, analytical, meticulous, adventurous, inquisitive? Branding folk call these types of words ‘brand values’. Nike, Apple and Starbucks all have brand values. They lie at the heart of all great brands and provide the foundation for all their brand building activities.
  3. Think about your target employer and conduct some research on how they describe themselves. You’ll be able to find this on company websites under their ‘values’. Write down their values in the right hand column of your table.
  4. Now here’s the crunch. Do at least three of the five words you’ve noted in the left column vaguely resemble words in the right hand column? If they do you’re in a good place because values inform beliefs and beliefs inform behaviour. If your values are aligned with your target employer there’s a good chance you’re going to behave in a way that fits with their culture. You’ll probably connect. Good times.
If the words you’ve used to describe yourself and your target employer don’t vaguely resemble each other then you need to think about the accuracy of the words you’ve chosen to describe yourself OR think about how much you really want to work at that company. You need to be brutally honest with yourself at this stage. It’s very important. Seek advice from a careers consultant if you’re struggling. Or some objective friends.

Finding the fit

If your values don’t fit with your target employer it’s going to be an uphill battle. You may get to interview based on your great CV or insightful personal blog but during the interview the chemistry won’t be right. You’ll behave in a way that doesn’t fit with their culture because your values are different. Even if you do manage to get through the interview it’s doubtful you’ll enjoy working there. You’ll struggle to relate to people whose values fit with the business. Thinking about your values and how they converge with those of your target employer is crucial.

So, you feel your values and those of your target employer fit. Great. Next you can actually start building your brand. You do this by making the words you have used to describe yourself happen (“bring your values to life”....to use the brand marketing lingo). This is achieved through design, communications and behaviour to name a few. If you’re “creative” and one of your target employer’s values is “creativity” you need to make sure your social media channels ooze with creativity. You need to communicate in a creative and engaging way. You need to demonstrate how you’ve behaved in creative ways during previous placements or jobs by solving problems in unique ways etc. It’s important you get this right. If your target employer thinks creativity is important (one of their values) your brand screaming ‘creativity’ will resonate with them when they experience your brand. They’ll identify with you because they’ll have values that are akin to creativity. This increases the chance of them wanting to know more and this could, just could, get you through the door.

I hope this provides a start and the steps are crystal clear. Err, just like water!



Dr. Darren Coleman has over 15 years brand marketing experience and is the Managing Consultant at Wavelength Marketing. Wavelength offers brand advice, insight, education and design to service brands in the UK, continental Europe, the Middle East and South East Asia. Darren has helped hundreds of students and executives build personal brands. Darren tweets @onthewavelength, blogs and is LinkedIn.

*If you'd like to learn more about personal branding email darren@wavelengthmarketing.co.uk 
Dr.

January 08, 2013

Looking for something different? Try procurement…

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SamHeard the word procurement and switched off? It's certainly true to say that procurement has had something of an image problem amongst students. Well maybe it's time to think again and consider a career in procurement. But don't just listen to the recruiters - read what Sam Teasdale, a business studies student on an industrial placement with National Grid has to say...

I'm currently working for National Grid, taking a year out from my business studies degree. Getting a 2:1 in my first year helped me progress past the preliminary stages for placement applications, as generally placements expect minimum 2:1. I am currently working in procurement (think of it as developing purchasing strategies and then purchasing everything the company requires) and hope that this post will encourage other students to consider this field and also recognise the benefits of taking a 'year out' to acquire some professional work experience.

The assessment centre - not as scary as you think!

Personally I thought one of the daunting experiences in the application was going to be the assessment centre; however on reflection this wasn’t as bad as I had anticipated. National Grid’s assessment centre is a two day event whereby you attend a dinner with the other candidates on the evening of first day and then complete the assessment day on second day.

The structure of the assessment centre was split into 3 tasks; interview, presentation and group exercise each are designed to test your skills in the 4 competency areas; developing oneself, building relationships, planning to achieve and presentation skills. Ensure you have some relevant examples to back up any questions surrounding these competency areas but overall the process really wasn’t that scary! Honest!

Using the skills I've developed at University

My placement is situated within Global Procurement which is responsible for annual spend in the region of £4.3bn globally making this department a crucial function to National Grid, more specifically I work in Global Procurement Strategy (GPS) as a strategy analyst. During my 12 months here I will be spending time in each of the 4 teams that make up GPS; Market Intelligence & Sustainability, Data & Systems, Performance Management and Process. Currently situated in Market Intelligence I am responsible for using my research skills developed at University to create high quality reports for buyers regarding market analysis they may require, this includes who’s out there, regulations, key drivers and generic market information. I then collate this into a slide deck and present back to the buyer, this is a very popular method and the buyers really do use this critical information.

Working in areas I'm passionate about...like sustainability

The second part of my current job lies with sustainability, looking at how National Grid Procurement can become more sustainable for the future, whether the answer is to source more sustainable products or to change the specifications we usually use to procure to include increased energy efficiency, reduced carbon output or reduce our water usage in the supply chain. This element of my placement is particularly exciting as sustainability is a key prority - not just for National Grid - but other large corporations. Being able to do things now that are going to impact National Grid for years to come is particularly rewarding.

Team work, communication, organisational skills? Welcome to the world of procurement

I believe the key skills required to be successful in procurement are excellent communication, you will regularly be talking with your internal team and external teams. Once you start project work you could be working with other areas of this vast business and key stakeholders. Additionally another vital skill is team working, everything we do here in National Grid will centre on working as a team, and whether this is daily tasks or project work you will need to be able to blend with others. You will also need to be highly organised and be able to prioritise tasks accordingly, organisation is key as you will need to organise your workload and you must be able to prioritise your workloads each week for what needs to be completed and what can be put on the backburner for a while.

Why National Grid?

The support umbrella here at National Grid is fantastic, my line manager and the team are really supportive of me and interested in my personal development and how to maximise my potential. If I have any issues I can usually resolve them with my manager or team however if I had an issue that couldn’t be resolved ‘in house’ I have a dedicated Business coordinator to speak to and a personal buddy, as you can see there are enough people to support you during 12 months here. Upon enrolment in National Grid you are asked to join Newnet which is a community of new starters, Newnet organises socials, talks, visits and networking events to really make your experience here at National Grid a good one. This is a great opportunity as the services they offer are invaluable as a networking tool; moreover site visits and talks enabled me to learn more about National Grid as a whole and accelerate your integration into the company. I have felt like a valued (permanent) employee rather than a placement student

Overall I believe procurement is a fantastic department to have a placement, the experience and knowledge gained is invaluable and will ensure you develop as a person ready to secure that graduate job.

* The graduate guide to procurement is worth a look if you're considering other opportunities within the sector.


January 02, 2013

New year, new perspective?

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New YearThe holiday season is coming to a close, and with it that transient state of denial when we defer our worries, spend what we want, eat even more and exist in a virtual bubble of seasonal goodwill. And then New Year comes knocking, forcing many of us into a period of uneasy contemplation, thinking about what we've achieved and what still lies ahead. For some, this is a time to translate thought into action, defining goals for the year ahead in a series of 'resolutions'. I've never managed to make any resolutions, much less commit to them but I can see the value in taking stock. I'm just not convinced it needs to be date stamped. By seeing the New Year as a 'before' and 'after', you're in danger of setting yourself up to fail. 'Should' is a word laden with high expectations and offers nothing but a one way guilt trip. “I should get a job by the time I graduate” is an oft-heard refrain. Well great if you do, but what if this doesn’t quite materialise? By all means keep this aim in mind, but if you truly want 2013 to be a year of career success, you may need to see it as part of a longer journey, not just a final destination.

Be realistic

If you're a final year student and haven't really thought much about your career until now, you may struggle to combine the pressures of academic work and job search. Concentrate on the former - without a good degree, you'll find it hard to compete for any graduate level job, much less the highly prized graduate schemes. This doesn't mean you should neglect your career development - far from it - but you need to be honest about what you can achieve over the next few months. Finding a job is pretty time consuming, and you don't want to cut corners and apply for something that isn't right for you. There are small practical steps you can take now that will give you a firm anchor until you're ready (and have the time) to commit to your job search.

  • Talk to a careers consultant. They can help you make sense of where you are now, and offer reassurance that you're not alone. It might feel like everyone else is sorted - they're not!
  • Get your CV and LinkedIn profile up to scratch. This is something tangible you can do now, and it's also a good way to see how 'job ready' you are. Ignorance is far from bliss. Pretending you don't have gaps in your skills or experience won't make them go away. Better to know and be able to take action (whether now or when you graduate) than leave it and hope for the best.
  • If you haven't got any work experience, start making plans to find some. Unless you’re a seriously good multi-tasker, you may find it hard to fit a work placement around your revision during the Easter vacation, so it might be wise to concentrate on summer opportunities. If you're looking for help and guidance with the process, then come along to our work experience advice drop-in.
  • Take advantage of the career development workshops available throughout the spring and summer terms. In summer 2012 we launched the Career Success Toolkit to help finalists work through their careers angst; we'll be doing the same this year, so keep an eye out for news, info and workshop dates.

By all means, set yourself some deadlines to keep you on track but make them realistic. If you set the bar too high, you'll simply lose confidence and motivation when you 'fail' to clear the height.

Be resilient

If you have been on the job search treadmill and simply feel like you’re standing still, or even going backwards, now is the time to dig deep. We’re all at the mercy of external factors and influences (the economy, just for starters) and despite your best intentions – and efforts - you may have to deviate off course, or adjust your timeframe. If you’re not prepared for this it can be disheartening. Last year I wrote an article for the Guardian trying to help students and graduates find a way to maintain a positive, resilient attitude. It’s not easy, but small changes in behaviour and outlook can yield surprising results. I don't think much has changed in a year since I wrote that piece and I would probably echo the same sentiments, but with one or two further suggestions:

  • Try to avoid repeating the same mistakes. If you’ve fired off 200 applications and not received a positive response, ask yourself: is my strategy working? And then seek out help. It may be that a few minor tweaks to your CV will do the trick, but what if you're heading down the wrong career path? It's easier to change direction now, than plough more time and energy into a long and fruitless job search.
  • Ask for feedback. What do your friends, peers, family, employers think of you? Self-perception may not be the most reliable barometer of your 'worth’. Take the good with the bad. Successful people know their limits and play to their strengths.
  • If you haven’t already, join the relevant professional body or association for your sector or industry. A great source of information, news and potential vacancies and a whole network of new contacts to help motivate, inspire and support you.

In a world that’s become seduced by instant gratification, we often lose sight of the long game. Career spans a lifetime, not just a few years - there's plenty of time to 'get it right'.


December 12, 2012

Start your career in an SME

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ForkIt's easy to see why so many students are drawn to the big graduate recruiters: prestige, salary, structured training and a fairly transparent (if sometimes rather lengthy) selection process. Competition for graduate schemes is intense, but the eye watering applicant to offer ratio doesn't seem to deter students - quite the opposite. And there's some powerful psychology at play: graduate schemes are synonymous with "success" - it takes a pretty confident and self-assured individual to resist their lure. Over the years I've seen scores of students who feel they should apply to big multinationals, and yet can't articulate a convincing reason why beyond a sense of expectation - it's what I'm supposed to do - or peer pressure - all my flatmates are applying.

Big graduate recruiters have a strong campus presence, which both reflects and sustains the relationship between students and recruiters. Companies wouldn't waste time and money on high profile promotional activities if they didn't work. Many of you will bag yourself a place on a grad scheme, but some won't and for a sizeable minority such opportunities may not be the best way to realise your career aspirations. It may just be time to broaden your horizons - and job search - and start thinking about SMEs...

Ok, so what are SMEs?

This is just a handy acronym for small and medium sized enterprises, defined as independent companies employing fewer than 250 employees. And here's an interesting fact: SMEs account for 99.9% of all private sector businesses in the UK and employ over 14 million people - pretty astonishing when you consider that SMEs are at best peripheral to, and at worst, completely absent from, many students' job search. We have seen increased SME engagement with our employer services over the past year and it's safe to say this is a becoming an important growth area for graduate recruitment. Not quite the same order of magnitude as the big corporates, but significant nonetheless. A quick search on myAdvantage today generated 38 immediate start vacancies, covering sectors as diverse as IT, marketing, media, finance and recruitment.

Perception v reality

A recent survey by graduate-jobs.com, shed some light on student perceptions of SMEs and why there's a general reluctance to view SMEs as a viable alternative to the blue chips. Of the questions asked, the following three are the most illuminating:

  1. Over a pretend 12 month period do think you would learn more working for an SME or a large company? 76% said SME, with 25% voting for large company.
  2. Which would you consider more of a risk - working for an SME or working for a large company? 73% felt it was higher risk to work for an SME.
  3. Do you think it's more prestigious to work for an SME or a large company? 86% think it is more prestigious to work for a large company

It's hardly surprising that perception of risk (not without some foundation) precludes some of you from exploring the SME angle, but I can't help wondering if the response to question three is rather more telling? Are you wedded to the dream of a 'graduate job' because it confers status, and signals to the world that you've arrived...and succeeded? There's nothing wrong with that - we all like recognition, but in the current climate you may be artificially restricting your options if you concentrate your search exclusively on the big players. By waiting for that job offer (which may never come) you could miss out on the chance to get some real world experience and start building your career portfolio.

What are the benefits?

Now, I'm aware that anecdote doesn't equal evidence but I do have a personal story worth sharing. An acquaintance of mine who graduated last year (Russell Group; 2;1) spent a good few months post-graduation applying for any and every corporate finance scheme. Number of job offers: 0. As reality dawned he started to widen his job search and - his words - "lower my sights". He soon found a marketing job with a small digital media company. The salary and fringe benefits can't compare with the big graduate recruiters, but the experience certainly can: he's handling client accounts, organising corporate events and has played an active role at the negotiating table. Pretty impressive and guaranteed to wow future employers.

There are some real tangible benefits that come from working for an SME:

  • Smaller teams and a flatter organisational/management structure can create opportunities for you to shoulder early responsibility, manage projects and exercise greater influence over decision making.
  • Hands on experience. SMEs are not equipped to offer the same level of training and supervision as their larger rivals, so you may just have to get stuck in. A sure-fire way to become resourceful and resilient!
  • Roles in smaller organisations are often less rigid, so there's more chance for you to 'grow' your job and get involved with other tasks and functions.

If you can work with minimal supervision, are flexible, pragmatic and have a healthy dose of common sense then you may just find the SME route worth considering.

Where to find SME vacancies

SMEs are operating within much tighter budget constraints than big corporates, so try to minimise risk with recruitment and selection. They advertise 'as and when' and don't align with the graduate recruitment cycle. Don't expect a lengthy recruitment process: typically you would apply with a CV and covering letter and may be offered an interview (and job!) within a week or so. You'll need to be a little more resourceful and proactive in your job search, so make sure you:

  • Use myAdvantage vacancy search - you can set criteria by location, sector and start date.
  • Check the local and national press - keep your search area as broad as possible.
  • Use your networks - face to face and online (see this: social media core medium for SME recruitment).
  • Keep up to date with business/industry press - who's expanding, diversifying? Any new start-ups?
  • Are you near any science or business parks? Why not send some speculative applications?
  • Consider Step if you're looking for a shorter placement - this could be a good way in.

SMEs are keen to recruit bright, capable graduates who want to contribute from day one. You may initially lose out in the glamour and finance stakes, but you'll gain valuable knowledge and experience. What better way to drive your career forward?


November 29, 2012

Using social media in your job search

social media icons

We've already blogged about the power of social media, but plenty of students are still unsure how to use social media to further their job search. I recently caught up with Tom Bourlet, Social Media and SEO Executive, to ask for his thoughts...

How can Twitter help my job search?

There are a number of useful tools which you can incorporate into your job search. Tweetdeck can allow you to track keywords used in tweets in a well laid out platform. If you're searching for a marketing job in Brighton, type in ‘marketing job Brighton’, and Tweetdeck would list all tweets recently sent out including these keywords. Alternatively you could search for ‘marketing jobs’, ‘jobs UK marketing’ or ‘advertising vacancy Brighton’. And don’t forget to use TwitJobSearch to find jobs on Twitter. A quick search for ‘PR intern UK’ generated 198 results. Not bad for 2 seconds’ work!

Following companies on Twitter that you have an interest in or are applying to and also regularly commenting on their posts can also help your visibility (and credibility) and may help you find a point of difference from other applicants.

If you're going to make your Twitter feed publicly accessible - and it rather negates the point if you don't - then make sure your profile and avatar are professional. Don't neutralise your content to such an extent that it feels bland, but trying to balance the personal and professional. Optimise your bio to include relevant, specific information. Every word counts.

Building a strong profile in your industry on Twitter and gaining regular influencers as followers can significantly increase your chances of hearing about a job position which have not been placed online yet placed online yet. I have received a number of job offers through Twitter simply through contacts I have made while networking on the social platform. But it is important not to overstate its impact - in some sectors (PR, media) you may be heavily disadvantaged by not having a visible Twitter feed; in others it will make no difference at all.

What about LinkedIn – do recruiters really look?

If you’re actively looking for a job, it would be inconceivable to ignore LinkedIn. It doesn’t take too long to simply transfer your CV content onto the social platform. Also consider the judicious use of keywords in your summary to make sure your profile appears in LinkedIn itself and external searches. Join some of the groups based on your industry and if there aren’t any, why not take the initiative and set up your own? Other users might start to gravitate to you as a ‘power member’ – a great way to get yourself noticed. If you're completely new to LinkedIn check out these 'Top tips' to help get you started.

Facebook is my social space - how can it help my job hunt?

You’re probably all aware that some recruiters are checking out potential applicants on Facebook (stats vary - anything from a highly questionable 90% to a more likely 40%) and you’ll all be familiar with the need to manage your profile and adjust your privacy settings to control what information is publicly viewable. Understandably many of you want to keep that distinction between ‘work’ and ‘social’, but don't dismiss the (potential) power of Facebook as a job search tool. And talking of 'search' use this function on Facebook to help you find relevant groups and employers. Finding people with shared career interests and common goals is a quick and effective way of growing your network. Most major employers will also have company pages, so find, view and like the page as a first step to showing your interest.

There are a number of Facebook job search apps, but reception has been somewhat mixed. It may be, for now, that the best way to maximise the power of Facebook is to use keywords, status updates (tell people you're actively looking) and group/company pages to keep yourself updated and informed. It's unlikely that Facebook will overtake LinkedIn as a professional networking platform, but the chances are you're on there anyway, so you might just as well exploit its job search potential.

What about blogging?

Blogging can be another way to illustrate your knowledge, technical abilities and establish your online profile. Writing a blog is very simple to set up, and the benefits are considerable. Set up the blog as your own website with consistent, content rich posts and others will soon recognise you as a strong voice in the field. Having a successful blog can also help place your name in front of organisations that you might consider applying to.

If you do decide to set up a blog, try WordPress as there are a vast number of benefits to this platform, including the wide array of plug-ins which can be used. You could also sign up to Triberr and build a strong blogging community with others in your related field.

Google places a lot of power in authorship, so if you blog regularly and set up rel=author properly, Google will begin to recognise you as an expert in your field – this should certainly wow any potential employers.

What else is out there?

Try thinking outside of the box and consider some of the other platforms such as Instagram, Pinterest or setting up a YouTube Channel. A few people I know have actually received job interviews partially based on their work on Instagram, using it to help them connect with people and showcase their skills and creativity. But, it’s not just for the creative or media savvy: neither of these friends worked in creative fields - one is a nutritionist and the other one works as in procurement. What may start off as a side project or interest can potentially generate some interesting career opportunities - at the very least it will demonstrate a raft of skills to potential recruiters. Writing, presenting (if you're feeling bold!), editing, creativity and a general confidence with digital media. Believe me, there are plenty of graduate job seekers out there who don't have these skills...

Tom Bourlet is a Social Media and SEO Executive for Directline Holidays, a freelancer and consultant for a number of companies including SNC Direct and Omprakash. Tom graduated from Brighton University with a degree in Business Management. You can find Tom on Twitter @tom_bourlet


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